Program

Keynote Speakers

Richard BealeDr. Richard Beale
Consultant Intensivist, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Dr. Beale is a Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, and his clinical and research interests include sepsis, haemodynamic monitoring, advanced ventilation, nutrition for the critically ill, and ICU informatics. He is Clinical Director for Perioperative, Critical Care and Pain Services at Guy's and St Thomas', and Reader in Intensive Care Medicine at King's College London. He is also Co-Leader of the Clinical Academic Group within King's Health Partners AHSC that includes Critical Care, and is acute Clinical Academic Group Development lead for King's Health Partners, with honorary membership of the KHP Executive. He is a frequent invited speaker at national and international meetings, and is an ESICM representative on the Steering Committee of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. He is Chair of the Research Committee of the ESICM, an is a member of the ESICM Executive.
 

Maureen CoombsDr. Maureen Coombs MBE
Professor of Clinical Nursing (Critical Care), Graduate School of Nursing Midwifery and Health, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand
Capital Coast District Health Board, Wellington, New Zealand

Maureen has over 30 years UK experience in critical care nursing encompassing clinical practice, education, service management and research roles. Her current role as Professor in Clinical Nursing (Critical Care) is a joint appointment between Victoria University Wellington and Capital and Coast District Health Board. As a Clinical Professor, Maureen provides strategic leadership to the clinical programmes at GSNMH whilst undertaking high quality clinical research to improve patient outcome and experience.

Maureen's clinical practice with long term chronically critically ill patients has directed her research programme on end of life care. Her work in this area explores: end of life trajectories in intensive care; decisions making at end of life; experiences of families at this time; and interventions to support decision making and family coping. She is an experienced qualitative researcher.

She has published and presented extensively on advanced assessment; management of critically ill patients within ward environments and critical care; end of life care; and clinical academic careers. Maureen has an established international profile having worked with the Department of Health, England and undertaken lecturing and consultancy work in the UK, South Africa and Australasia. She has been past Chair of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses and recognised in the UK for her contribution to critical care nursing with the award of a Member of the British Empire in 2004.
 

Jack IwashynaDr. Jack Iwashyna
Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Michigan, USA

Theodore "Jack" Iwashyna, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Michigan, where his clinical practice is as a medical intensivist. He is also part of the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research and the Center for Clinical Management Research at the Ann Arbor VA HSR&D Center of Excellence.

Dr. Iwashyna's research interests are, broadly, in critical care organization and outcomes. Most recently, he has been examining the population-health impact and long-term outcomes of severe sepsis. His current research seeks to understand the ways in which severe sepsis fundamentally alters survivors' lives, and the extent to which differences in acute care can lead to enduring differences in disability and health care needs after sepsis.
 

Niranjan Tex KissoonDr. Niranjan "Tex" Kissoon MD, FRCP(C), FAAP, FCCM, FACPE
President, World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
Vice-President, Medical Affairs, BC Children's Hospital
Professor, Pediatric and Surgery (EM) Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
UBC BCCH Professor in Acute and Critical Care, Global Child Health

Dr. Niranjan "Tex" Kissoon is the President of the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies, Vice-President, Medical Affairs at BC Children’s Hospital and Professor, Pediatric and Surgery (EM) Department of Pediatrics at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC as well as the UBC BCCH Professor in Acute and Critical Care - Global Child Health. He completed his medical studies at the University of West Indies in Jamaica, followed by residencies in Pediatrics and Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

In recognition of his contribution to pediatric emergency and critical care medicine, he was awarded the Distinguished Career Achievement Award by the American Academy of Pediatrics in October 2012 in New Orleans.

Dr. Kissoon's international work has included work in China, India, Bangladesh, Brazil and Africa, often in areas of vulnerability and limited resources for the critically ill child.

Together with his esteemed colleagues, he developed a Global Alliance for Sepsis (www.globalsepsisalliance.org) and an International Pediatric Sepsis Initiative (www.wfpiccs.org). He was the Chair of the committee on Pediatric Mass Critical Care Task Force and the Guest Editor of the resulting Supplement in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.
 

Peter LaussenDr. Peter C. Laussen MBBS
Chief of Critical Care Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
Professor of Anaesthesia, University of Toronto

Peter Laussen is a native of Melbourne, Australia, and graduated from Melbourne University Medical School in 1980, and subsequently completed fellowships in anesthesia and pediatric critical care medicine at the Austin Hospital and Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne. He joined the Cardiac Anesthesia faculty at Children's Hospital Boston in 1992 and the Division of Cardiac Intensive Care in 1993. In 1996 he was appointed the co-Director of the Cardiac Anesthesia Service, and in April 2002 was appointed Chief of the Division of Cardiac Intensive Care in the Department of Cardiology at Children’s Hospital Boston. In 2002, he also became the first incumbent of the Dolly D. Hansen Chair in Pediatric Anesthesia at Children's Hospital Boston, and in 2008 a Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School. In 2012, he was appointed Chief of the Department of Critical Care Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and Professor in Anaesthesia at the University of Toronto. Dr. Laussen started and continues to lead the implementation of a web-based program to integrate, capture and store real-time physiologic data in critical care to enhance interactive and meaningful visualization of data streams, as well as the analysis of data to develop predictive algorithms to improve outcomes and quality of care. Dr. Laussen has experience in aspects of systems and human engineering applied to critical care, and has published and lectured on quality assurance initiatives in critical care related to work flow and adverse events including healthcare acquired infection and resuscitation. He is a founding member of http://www.risky-business.com and has co-organized a number of national and international Risky Business conferences directed at addressing human and system factors, using lessons learned from high risk industries in an effort to improve the safety and quality of healthcare.
 

Elaine MeyerA/Prof. Elaine C. Meyer Ph.D., R.N.
Director, Institute for Professionalism & Ethical Practice, Children's Hospital Boston, USA
Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, USA

Elaine Meyer is a clinical psychologist who has worked in neonatal and pediatric critical care settings for 20 years, with a particular focus on end-of-life issues and humanism in health care. Her clinical work and innovation has contributed to the field's understanding of factors influencing parental end of life decision-making, psychosocial care delivery models, spirituality, and the psychological aftermath of critical care hospitalization. Current positions held are Director, Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS), Boston Children's Hospital; Research Associate, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital; Associate Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Director, Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice (IPEP), Boston Children's Hospital.

During Elaine's early work in critical care, she discovered the universal premium that families place on honest communication and trustworthy relationships with their care providers. She also realized that most critical care clinicians feel profoundly unprepared and lack confidence when facing challenging conversations. Consequently, she turned her efforts to establishing an innovative Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) simulation-enhanced educational paradigm to help clinicians when confronted with difficult conversations. Given the strength, applicability and growth of the PERCS educational paradigm, the Institute for Professionalism (IPEP) was established at Boston Children's Hospital Director, and Elaine was appointed Director. To date, over 2500 interdisciplinary practitioners have been trained in relational learning at the Institute. Elaine embraced the educational promise of simulation early, joined the Society for Simulation in Healthcare and International Society for Pediatric Simulation, and established herself as a leader in the applicability of simulation to teach interpersonal & communication skills, ethics and professionalism. Elaine has presently widely nationally and internationally, and has published over 75 peer reviewed articles and chapters.
 

Kay MitchellMs. Kay Mitchell
Project Manager, Xtreme Everest
Executive Board, London, United Kingdom

Kay is the Critical Care Senior Research Manager, NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, based at University Hospital Southampton, UK. Kay is also a key member of the team organising medical research expeditions at the University College London (UCL) Centre for Altitude Space and Extreme Environment (CASE) Medicine. These have included the Caudwell Xtreme Everest expedition (2007) and Xtreme Everest 2, due to take place in March 2013. These expeditions involve using healthy volunteers to improve our understanding of the effects of hypoxia, and thus develop treatments to improve outcomes. In addition, she is interested in the factors that inhibit patients experiencing extreme difficulty in weaning them from mechanical ventilators.

In addition, Kay is the Acting Managing Director of the Centre for Nurse and Midwife led Research at UCL. This was set up to develop research capacity and capability amongst nurses and midwives. She developed the concept for the Centre in collaboration with the University College London Hospital (UCLH) Deputy Chief Nurse (Head of Nursing Surgery and Cancer Board) Sheila Adam. After securing start up funding the embarked on setting it up in 2010.

Kay studied at the Oxford School of Nursing before completing a BSc in Human Sciences at UCL. She then joined Midland Bank on a Graduate Management Programme, and worked as a Customer Services Manager at a large London branch. Since returning to nursing, Kay has worked as an Intensive Care nurse at UCLH and the Homerton Hospital in London, focusing on practice development and education. She completed her MSc in Adult Critical Care at Imperial College London in 2007. She moved her base to Southampton in August 2012.

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Invited Speakers - Adult Program

Mike AndersonDr. Mike Anderson FANZCA, FCICM, PGDipEcho
Senior Staff Specialist, Department of Intensive Care, Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

Dr Mike Anderson is currently a Senior Staff Specialist in the Department of Intensive Care at Royal Adelaide Hospital. Mike joined the full-time staff of the RAH Intensive Care Unit in 2012. Mike was previously ICU Director, Launceston General Hospital and full time specialist at The Alfred Hospital. He is a member of the Australian Resuscitation Council, and a prior CICM Board member.
 

Mike ArcherProf. Mike Archer
Evolution of Earth and Life Systems Research Group, School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW

Mike Archer was born in Sydney but grew up in Appalachia in the USA where, while learning to play the banjo and make moonshine, he became obsessed with fossils from the age of 11. After graduating from Princeton University he returned to Australia in 1967 to do his PhD in the University of WA, became Curator of Mammals at the Queensland Museum (from 1972), Lecturer in the University of New South Wales (from 1978), Director of the Australian Museum (1999-2003), Dean of Science at the University of NSW (2004-2009) and Prof. in the School of BEES. His research projects span the deep past such as the World Heritage fossil deposits of Riversleigh, the fragile present such as conservation through sustainable use of native resources including having native animals as pets, securing the future based on the wisdom of the fossil record and, at the extreme edge, trying to bring extinct species back into the world of the living. As a research professor he has supervised more than 50 PhD students, produced many books and publications and received a list of medals and other honours, including Fellowship in the Academy of Science, the Inaugural Eureka Prize for the Promotion of Science and Member of the Order of Australia.
 

Ian BaldwinProf. Ian Baldwin
Professor, Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, VIC

Ian is from the Austin Hospital and has an affiliation with RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia. Ian is post graduate coordinator and clinical educator for Intensive Care Nursing and Research. Ian has undertaken many research and quality activities in Intensive Care, and has presented as a key note speaker at multiple scientific meetings in Australia, the United States, Europe and Asia. Ian has completed both a Masters and PhD by research and has over 90 publications devoted to the application of renal replacement therapies, acute renal failure and acid base management, adverse event monitoring, quality and education activities in the ICU.
 

Rinaldo BellomoProf. Rinaldo Bellomo
Co-Director, ANZIC-RC & Director, Intensive Care Research, Austin Health, VIC
Professorial Fellow, Faculty of Medicine, University of Melbourne, VIC
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Hospital, VIC

Professor Bellomo is the Founding Chairman of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group and the current Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre. His research interests include all aspects of critical care nephrology, sepsis, blood purification, acid-base physiology, resuscitation and critical illness prevention. He has received >60 national and international awards and grants, has delivered lectures at >100 national and international conferences and has authored more than 700 PubMed cited papers. He is editor in chief of Critical Care and Resuscitation, the official journal of the ANZ College of Intensive Care Medicine.
 

Bernie BissettMrs. Bernie Bissett
Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Physiotherapy, University of Canberra, ACT

Bernie Bissett is an ICU physiotherapist with more than 10 years' clinical experience. She is completing a PhD through the University of Queensland focused on inspiratory muscle training to hasten weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Bernie is also interested in the multifactorial nature of dyspnoea and weaning, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in extubation decisions. Bernie's research interests also include early mobilisation, lung ultrasound, simulated learning and student supervision. With 5 years' experience as a clinical educator at Canberra Hospital, and more recently as a lecturer for the University of Canberra, Bernie's enthusiasm for physiotherapy in ICU is being shared with Australia's next generation of physiotherapists.
 

Marianne ChapmanA/Prof. Marianne Chapman
Senior Staff Specialist in Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA
Clinical Associate Professor, School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, SA

A/Prof. Marianne Chapman is a Senior Staff Specialist in Intensive Care Medicine at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and a Clinical Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of Adelaide. Her clinical research interests include gastrointestinal dysfunction underlying problems with the administration of enteral nutrition, in the critically ill.
 

Hugh DaviesDr. Hugh Davies
Nurse Researcher & Adjunct Research Fellow, Curtin University, WA
Clinical Nurse, Intensive Care Unit, Royal Perth Hospital, WA
ACCCN National Secretary & WA Branch National Representative, WA

Dr. Hugh Davies has over twenty years clinical experience in the area of critical care nursing. In 2005 he was the recipient of the Helen Bailey research scholarship awarded by the Health Department of WA for his PhD on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), and was also awarded the Nursing Scholarship Prize after presenting his findings at the 31st Australian & New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting on Intensive Care 2006. He has co-authored a number of peer-reviewed publications on the topics of acute kidney injury (AKI) and CRRT. In his role as Nurse Researcher and Adjunct Research Fellow at Curtin University, Dr Davies combines his responsibilities as a Clinical Nurse at Royal Perth Hospital intensive care unit to supervise the implementation and successful completion of a variety of nursing research projects.
 

Adam DeaneDr. Adam Deane MBBS PhD FRACP FCICM
Consultant, Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

Adam is an Intensive Care Physician/Scientist with research interests relating to nutrition and glucose metabolism. Adam has received numerous grants and awards and has a track record for publishing innovative research. Despite his tendency to tell lame jokes he is occasionally invited to present at scientific meetings. More often he isn't invited back.

He is passionate about awakening medical students and intensive care trainees to the joys of clinical research. Like most intensivists Adam struggles to keep abreast of all the advances in critical care medicine, but he welcomes you to join the session titled 'I haven't read a journal in two years: What can I learn in 90 minutes?' as he explores some of recent advances in our specialty.
 

Fleur DewhurstMs. Fleur Dewhurst 

Fleur is a qualified Barrister and Solicitor who specialises in medical law and is currently employed at the Royal Hobart as the Medico-Legal Advisor. Fleur also consults on a regular basis with MDA.

Prior to commencing work at the Royal Hobart Hospital in 2007, Fleur worked in private legal practice for a number of years working in the area of civil litigation in the area of medical law, insurance law and construction.

In addition to private practice, Fleur has also consulted for Health Legal a firm specialising in providing advice to Hospitals across Australia.

Fleur also has a clinical background, working as a Registered Nurse for a number of years in the acute care setting.
 

Simon FosterMr. Simon Foster 

Following completion of nursing studies, Simon worked in the Operating Theatres and Intensive Care Units before moving into Nursing Administration. Simon began a new phase in his career in 2006 when he took up the role of Director of Corporate Services responsible for financial and non clinical management of the North West Area Health Services, Tasmania. During this time Simon developed a number of innovative models of data interrogation to support staff in understanding the business.

Tasked with developing the Business Intelligence Unit in 2010 Simon has continued to develop interactive information systems to assist with clinical engagement. He has extended the model across North West and South public hospitals in Tasmania.

Simon is currently liaising with the Intermountain HealthCare group in Salt Lake City, Utah in relation to clinical redesign and clinical process mapping.
 

Peter FowlerMr. Peter Fowler
Senior Clinical Pharmacist, Launceston General Hospital, TAS

Peter Fowler is the senior clinical pharmacist at the Launceston General Hospital and has over 20 years' experience in critical care pharmacy practice. Peter has particular interests in nutrition in the critically ill and optimisation of drug therapy in organ failure and support (including renal replacement therapy). Peter is also interested in systems design to enhance patient safety, including processes to support clinician decision making. Peter is a teacher of medical students, pharmacy student, nurses pharmacists and doctors. He is an honorary senior lecturer at the University of Tasmania School of Medicine and has presented numerous papers at state and national pharmacy, medical and nursing meetings, including ANZICS/ACCCN conferences.
 

John FraserProf. John Fraser
Professor of ICU and Anaesthesia, The University of Queensland, QLD
Director, Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital, QLD
Director of ICU, St Andrews War Memorial Hospital, QLD

John Fraser is a graduate of the University of Glasgow in 1991. Prior qualification in ICU medicine, he completed fellowships in internal medicine, anaesthesia and a PhD in fetal surgery. During his NHMRC fellowship-supported PhD, he won 13 national and international research awards, and was the co-founder of the Royal Children's Hospital Burns Research Group. John formed the Critical Care Research Group in 2004, which has now grown from humble beginnings to become the largest group of its kind in Australasia which encompasses Intensive Care, Cardiology, Cardiac surgery, Anaesthesia, Emergency and basic science, engineering and basic animal models. The group have developed three purpose built labs and work in a state of the art animal research facility, on transfusion models, acuter lung injury, artificial heart and transplantation of heart and lung, using the ex vivo lung resuscitation device. His interest in blood and ICU resulted in his PhD student Dr John Paul Tung winning the prestigious Vox Sanguinis Best Paper 2011 for his work on TRALI. He runs multiple animal, human and secondary data analysis studies in the field of blood and critical care. He recently devised and formed a national collaborative group aimed at optimising the utilisation of blood products in cardiac surgery. He has published over 190 peer reviewed papers, supervises 16 MPhil, PhD and honours students. He has 5 children and supports Glasgow Celtic.
 

Craig FrenchA/Prof. Craig French
Director of Intensive Care, Western Health, VIC

Craig French is the Director of Intensive Care at Western Health in Melbourne and a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne. He graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1988 and is a Fellow of both the College of Critical Care Medicine and Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists in 2002. His research interests include the conduct of multicentre ICU studies and transfusion medicine in the critically ill. Craig is a Chief Investigator in the EPO TBI and TRANSFUSE studies and the Blood Centre for Research Excellence. He is co-chair of the expert working group overseeing the development of National Patient Blood Management Guidelines and the treasurer of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group.
 

Paul FulbrookProf. Paul Fulbrook
Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery (ACU, McAuley Campus, Brisbane), QLD
Nursing Director, Research & Practice Development, The Prince Charles Hospital, QLD
National President, ACCCN

Paul is National President and Queensland President, ACCCN, and has been a National Board member for six years. He has been working in critical care nursing since 1986 in various clinical, educational, research, and professional roles. Having qualified as an intensive care nurse in the UK, he emigrated to Australia in late 2004. His current role is a joint appointment as Professor of Nursing with Australian Catholic University and Nursing Director Research at The Prince Charles Hospital in Brisbane, where he leads the Nursing Research and Practice Development Centre. His contribution to critical care nursing has been recognised formally via fellowships from the British Association of Critical Care Nurses and the European Federation of Critical Care Nursing Associations. Within the critical care context, he has published widely, has spoken at many international and national conferences, and is currently involved with several research projects in intensive care and emergency care.
 

David GattasDr. David Gattas
Senior Staff Intensivist, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW

Dr. David Gattas is a senior staff intensivist at Royal Prince Alfred (RPA) Hospital in Sydney. His academic and clinical interests include clinical trials, fluid resuscitation and renal replacement therapy. He directs the research program in the ICU at RPA and is chair of the committee which manages the hospital's response to deteriorating ward patients. He represents NSW on the Executive of the ANZICS CTG and was on the management committee of the CHEST Study. He has published two systematic reviews on the topic of hydroxyethyl starch.
 

Margot GreenMargot Green
ICU Physiotherapist Canberra Hospital, ACT

Margot is an ICU physiotherapist who is enthusiastic about multidisciplinary rehabilitation and early mobilisation of the critically ill and has a particular interest in the management and outcomes of long-term ICU patients. She is also interested in multidisciplinary tracheostomy management, weaning from mechanical ventilation and teaching and training new graduate physiotherapists. After working in ICU for more than 5 years Margot is excited about moving into clinical education whilst continuing her research into early mobilisation in ICU.
 

Peter HicksDr. Peter Hicks
Intensivist, Wellington Hospital, NZ

Since 1999 he has been working with ANZICS CORE and has been managing the Critical Care Resources division for the past three years. He has an interest in informatics and how to use clinical or management information to improve the delivery of care.

His involvement with ANZICS has included two years as President, five years on the executive, and being involved organising all 7 Safety Quality Audit and Outcome conferences. In his spare time he has recently walked the Camino de Santiago and has nearly published lots of papers.
 

Andrew HiltonDr. Andrew Hilton
Staff Specialist Intensive Care, The Austin Hospital, VIC

Andrew Hilton is a fulltime Intensivist and Supervisor of ICU Training at the Austin Hospital, Melbourne. His particular clinical interests are management of acute heart failure, care of the post-operative cardio-thoracic patient, and integration of ultrasonography into clinical practice. His non-clinical portfolio responsibilities at the Austin Hospital include training and practice of critical care echocardiography / ultrasonography; and ECMO. Current research includes echocardiographic assessment of patients with sepsis and septic shock, peripheral blood flow changes in the critically ill, ultrasound assessment of muscle changes in the ICU patient, and ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging of the kidney.
 

Carol HodgsonDr. Carol Hodgson
Research Fellow and a NHMRC Post-Doctoral ECR Fellow, ANZIC-RC, VIC

Carol is a Senior Research Fellow and a NHMRC post-doctoral ECR Fellow (2012-16) at the ANZIC-RC. Carol completed her PhD investigating recruitment manoeuvres and open ventilation strategies for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). She is a senior physiotherapist in intensive care at The Alfred with twenty years clinical experience and previously Carol completed a Masters by Research and a Postgraduate Diploma in Physiotherapy. She was awarded Fellowship of the Australian College of Physiotherapists (FACP) in 2009 and is a past national chair of Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy Australia (Australian Physiotherapy Association). Carol is lead investigator on the TEAM study and PHARLAP trials. Her areas of interest include ARDS, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation, ICU acquired weakness, early rehabilitation and long-term outcomes of ICU survivors.
 

Anthony HolleyCommander Anthony Holley RANR
Senior Staff Intensivist, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, QLD

Anthony is a dual qualified Intensivist and emergency physician, working as a full time staff specialist at Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. He is also the supervisor of intensive care training at RBWH and is a senior lecturer with the University of Queensland Medical School. He has served as an intensive care representative for the National Blood Authority Critical Care Group. Anthony is currently the Queensland Chairman for ANZICS. His teaching interests include the Early Management of Severe Trauma and Basic Assessment and Support in Intensive Care. Anthony is a Commander in the Royal Australian Navy Reserve and has deployed on multiple occasions, most recently returning from Afghanistan.
 

Stephen HoneybulMr. Stephen Honeybul
Consultant Neurosurgeon, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, WA

Stephen is a Neurosurgeon with a subspecialty interest in neurovascular surgery and a research interest in clinical outcome and ethics. He trained in UK and came to Australia in 2004 as a fellow and subsequently stayed on as a Consultant. He is currently a consultant neurosurgeon at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Head of Department of Neurosurgery at Royal Perth Hospital. Stephen is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, The Australasian college of Surgeons a member of the Neurological Society of Australasia and a member of the Neurosurgical Board of Australia. He has presented abstracts at over 100 national and international meetings worldwide and published over 50 articles in peer reviewed journals, the majority of which are as primary author. Current interests involve long term outcome and ethical issues regarding life saving but non restorative surgery following severe traumatic brain injury.
 

James IsbisterProf. James Isbister
Consultant in Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney, NSW

Professor James Isbister is Clinical Professor of Medicine, Sydney Medical School, Adjunct Professor, University of Technology and Monash University, Sydney and Emeritus Consultant Haematologist, Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney. He is the recent past Chair of the Advisory Committee and Board Member of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service and continues to be on the advisory committee and the research advisory committee. His key interests are research, teaching and policy development in patient blood management and transfusion medicine, including as a member of the National Blood Authority patient blood management steering committee and chair of the massive transfusion registry steering committee at the Monash University Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. Professor Isbister is chair of the Human Research Ethics Committee for the Northern Sector of the South Eastern Sydney Local Health District. He has over 150 publications and authorship of textbooks on haematology and transfusion medicine as well as contributions to several major critical care textbooks. His career contributions have been acknowledged by several national and international awards.
 

David KilpatrickProf. David Kilpatrick
Professor of Medicine, University of Tasmania, TAS

Professor Kilpatrick was trained with Celia Oakley at Hammersmith Hospital where he developed an interest in PAH which has continued. The advent of medications has resulted in him running a PAH unit in Tasmania since 2002. As part of this a database has been established for PAH in Tasmania which gives an extremely high incidence and prevalence (over 300 per million). His interests are in the diagnosis and haemodynamics of PH and when treatment is warranted. David is a Member of the Royal College of Physicians, United Kingdom, June, 1978. A Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, April 1983.
 

Alison KingsburyMs. Alison Kingsbury
Intensive Care Network Coordinator, ACT Health Directorate, ACT

Alison is an experienced critical care nurse who has spent most of her working career in Intensive Care in NSW, Queensland and the ACT and has worked as a volunteer with the Operation Open Heart team in Papua New Guinea over a number of years. Following the completion of her Critical Care studies in 1994, Alison worked as a clinical nurse, clinical nurse educator and nurse manager in a variety of intensive care settings. Alison has completed a Masters in Health Services Management as well as studies in adult education and project management. She is currently the Intensive Care Network Coordinator in the ACT and has an interest in staff and organisational development and promoting patient and family centred care. Alison is currently a NSW Branch committee member of ACCCN.
 

Anne LeditschkeDr. Anne Leditschke
Senior Specialist, Intensive Care Unit, Canberra Hospital, ACT
Senior Lecturer, ANU Medical School, ACT

Dr. Leditschke graduated in medicine from the University of Queensland and initially trained in general internal medicine, working as a consultant general physician in Brisbane before pursuing completing intensive care training. After several years of consultant intensive care practice in Brisbane, she moved to Canberra. She currently divides her work time between an academic tertiary metropolitan intensive care unit, as Senior Specialist in Intensive Care Medicine at Canberra Hospital and Senior Lecturer at ANU Medical School and a regional base hospital intensive care unit as Visiting Medical Officer in Intensive Care at Shoalhaven District Memorial Hospital. Her research interests include early rehabilitation in intensive care, and the role of inspiratory muscle training in ventilatory weaning.
 

Gavin LeslieDr. Gavin Leslie
Professor Critical Care Nursing, Curtin University and Royal Perth Hospital, WA

Prof. Leslie has worked in critical care for over 30 years in Sydney and Perth. He completed his undergraduate nursing degree conversion (1986), Post Grad Dip (1989) and PhD (2000) at Curtin University. He was founding national president of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses (now Australian College of Critical Care Nurses) and is a life member of ACCCN. Prof Leslie is current editor of Australian Critical Care and reviews for numerous journals including Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Critical Care and Resuscitation and Intensive Care Medicine. Over the last 5 years he has been involved in research grants investigating adverse events after ICU discharge, renal replacement therapies in the critically ill, pressure area prevention in trauma and critically ill patients, wound management, rehabilitation of survivors of critical illness, ventriculitis prevention and various aspects of enteral feeding. Prof Leslie joined Edith Cowan University (in 2000) as the inaugural joint appointment in Critical Care Nursing after working in education, clinical practice and administration in Intensive Care, Trauma and Emergency and research roles at Royal Perth Hospital. He developed the Master of Clinical Nursing and was course coordinator from 2004 - 2007. He also supervises PhD and Masters by Research and Coursework graduates. He joined the staff of Curtin University in 2007 and has since been appointed as Professor of Critical Care Nursing and Director of Research and Development in the School of Nursing & Midwifery whilst continuing his joint appointment and clinical research with RPH. He has published over 90 peer reviewed articles and journal editorials.
 

Elizabeth ManiasProf. Elizabeth Manias RN CertCritCare BPharm MPharm MNurs PhD DLF-ACN MPSA MSHPA
Professor, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC
Adjunct Professorial Fellow, Department of Medicine, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, VIC

Professor Elizabeth Manias is a qualified pharmacist and nurse, and works in the Melbourne School of Health Sciences, at The University of Melbourne. Professor Manias has been a member of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses, Quality Advisory Panel since 2010. Her areas of research include: patient safety, medication management, interpersonal and organisational communication, and consumer participation. She has extensive experience in undertaking hospital and community-based research using diverse methodological approaches. Professor Manias has been involved in undertaking hospital ethnographic studies, in developing and evaluating instruments, such as risk assessment tools for medication mismanagement, and in conducting interventional studies.
 

Andrea MarshallProf. Andrea Marshall
Professor of Acute and Complex Care Nursing, Griffith University and Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, QLD

Andrea Marshall is currently Professor of Acute and Complex Care Nursing at the Gold Coast Hospital and Griffith University, and a 2012 NHMRC TRIP (Translating Research into Practice) Fellow. Andrea's programme of research focuses on improving nutritional outcomes for acute and critically ill patients. She is currently the lead investigator on a study aimed at developing the capability of families of critically ill patients to advocate for best nutrition practice and this study is the key focus of her 2012 NHRMC TRIP Fellowship. Other nutrition research is being conducted in the areas of determining nutritional requirements using indirect calorimetry, the best methods for recording protein calorie intake in hospitalised patients receiving oral nutrition and screening for malnutrition in acute care settings. Critical care research is also underway focusing on outcomes for critically ill elderly patients, sedation practice and practice development in ICU. Andrea is a co-investigator on a recently successful NHMRC grant for a randomised controlled trial examining how to eecuring intravenous devices effectively in hospitals (The SAVE Trial). Professionally, Andrea remains active with the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses and is Associate Editor for Australian Critical Care and Deputy Chair of the ACCCN Research Advisory Panel. Andrea has published over 40 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to critical care nursing textbooks in Australia and overseas.
 

Tom MarwickProf. Tom Marwick
Director, Menzies Research Institute, TAS

Tom Marwick was formerly Head of Cardiovascular Imaging at Cleveland Clinic, and is now Director of the Menzies Research Institute in Hobart, Australia. He completed training in medicine and cardiology in Australia, before undertaking an Imaging Fellowship at Cleveland Clinic, a PhD at the University of Louvain, Belgium and a Masters in Public Health at Harvard. His main research interests relate to myocardial imaging and cost-effective application of cardiac imaging techniques for treatment selection and monitoring. He has published about 600 papers, reviews, chapters and editorials, and is an Editor at JACC-Cardiovascular Imaging. Dr. Marwick has been the recipient of more than fifty significant research grants and several awards, including the Simon Dack Award from the American College of Cardiology.
 

Colin McArthurMr. Colin McArthur
Director, Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand
Chair of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group

Mr. Colin McArthur is Director of the Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital and Chair of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. He has been involved in multi-centre clinical research in intensive care for 18 years, and has been on the management and writing committees for many major CTG trials. His current interests include clinical trial design, research ethics, severe influenza, nutrition and fluids.
 

Robyn MossDr. Robyn Moss
Intensivist, Princess Alexandra Hospital, QLD
Senior Lecturer, The University of Queensland, QLD

Robyn Moss is an intensivist at the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. Her clinical training included two years at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA and 6 months as a volunteer medic for Raleigh International in Namibia, Africa. As a senior lecturer for the University of Queensland she coordinates the Graduate Certificate in Critical Care Echocardiography, a joint venture between the University of Queensland and the Princess Alexandra Hospital.
 

Steph O'ConnorMs. Steph O'Connor
Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

Ms. Steph O'Connor studied nursing at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, graduating in 1993. Since 1994 she has been working in the field of Critical Care Nursing in general, adult, cardiothoracic, neonatal and paediatric ICUs, and High Dependency Units in Melbourne, Alice Springs & Adelaide. She also contributed to the creation and development of a new cardiothoracic surgical unit in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Steph was appointed to the Research Coordinator role in ICU at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) in Feb 2000 as a sole coordinator. Since then the department has expanded in size and her role has developed into a leadership/management role. In 2007 Steph became the South Australian "mentor" representative for the ANZICS, Clinical Trials Group, Intensive Care Research Coordinator Interest Group (IRCIG). In 2008 she became Vice Chair of IRCIG and then Chair 2009-2011. She is a member of a RAH Human Research Ethics Committee, ACCCN Research Advisory Panel and the Intensive Care Foundation Scientific Review Committee. Her research interests include critical illness, sepsis, sedation and nutrition. Steph is a member of the TARGET enteral nutrition study management committee.
 

Rachael ParkeMs. Rachael Parke
Chair IRCIG

Rachael Parke is the Research Nurse Coordinator in the Cardiothoracic and Vascular Intensive Care Unit at Auckland City Hospital, NZ and current Chairperson of the Australia and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Coordinator Interest Group (IRCIG). Rachael holds a current Health Research Council of New Zealand Clinical research training fellowship and is undertaking a PhD at the University of Auckland. She has published more than 24 articles and has been Principal or Co-investigator on peer reviewed research grants exceeding NS$900,000 including 3 Health Research Council of New Zealand grants. Rachael's research interests include oxygen therapy, noninvasive ventilation and cardiac surgery associated acute kidney injury.
 

Sandra PeakeA/Prof. Sandra Peake
Senior Staff Specialist, Department of Intensive Care, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, SA

Dr Peake is a Senior Intensive Care Clinician in the Department of Intensive Care Medicine at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide and an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of Adelaide. She is Chair of the Intensive Care Foundation Scientific Committee, Chair of the Research Committee for the Acute Care Medicine Discipline at the University of Adelaide and a member of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS-CTG) Executive Committee. She has been an examiner for the College of Intensive Care Medicine for the past 8 years. In 2000, she completed her PhD in Medicine at the University of Adelaide in the field of sepsis. Her thesis examined the role of combination anti-cytokine immunotherapy in an animal model of septic shock. Her main research interest now is large-scale, randomised clinical trials in critical care. She is currently Chair of the Management Committee for the NHMRC-funded, CTG-endorsed Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) multi-centre trial of early resuscitation in sepsis. She is also member of the Management Committee for the NHMRC-funded, CTG-endorsed multi-centre clinical trial of Early Parenteral Nutrition.
 

David PilcherDr. David Pilcher
Intensivist, The Alfred Hospital, VIC

Dave is an Intensive Care Specialist at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. He trained in General and Respiratory Medicine in the UK before completing Intensive Care training in Australia. He is Chair of the ANZICS Centre for Outcomes and Resource Evaluation, Director of the ANZICS Adult Patient Database, an Associate Professor with the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine at Monash University and a Medical Advisor to DonateLife in Victoria. His research interests are in the epidemiology and monitoring of Intensive Care outcomes, lung transplantation and organ donation.
 

Brent RichardsA/Prof. Brent Richards
Director of Intensive Care, Gold Coast University Hospital, Southport, QLD

Brent is the Director of Intensive Care at the new Gold Coast University Hospital, and chair of the Queensland Intensive Care Clinical Network. He chaired groups that created the ICU Clinical Services Capability Framework, and also a 10 year strategic plan for ICU in Queensland. He sits on ANZICS committees for Brain Death and Organ Donation, and End of Life Care.

Brent has been involved in eHealth projects and committees for Queensland health for many years, most recently as the Project Executive for the State Intensive Care Clinical Information System., a standardised CIS across 6 ICUs in Queenslan,d with three more ICUs planned in 2014.

Brent’s research interests are wide ranging, both as a foundation member of the ANZICS CTG and having been involved in numerous commercial multi-centre trials over the last 15 years (particularly anti-infective agents). His current interests are finding ideal PEEP, and lung recruitment.
 

Claire RickardProf. Claire Rickard
Professor, Intravascular Access Device Research Group, Griffith Health Institute, QLD

Professor Claire Rickard is a respected leader whose acute and critical care research has significantly influenced practice. She is a Fellow of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses, the Australian College of Nursing and in July of this year she was inducted into the International Nursing Research Hall of Fame in Prague by the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. Rickard's work has been recognised with Australian Nursing Innovation of the Year, and she has been selected as one of Australia's Top 10 Emerging Leaders in Health. Rickard undertakes large multi-centre randomized controlled trials and Cochrane systematic reviews of interventions to prevent complications in intravascular devices, including infection, blood loss and device failure. Rickard's has attracted almost over 7 million dollars in research funding; and has published in respected journals including The Lancet.
 

Kaye RollsMs. Kaye Rolls
Knowledge Manager, NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation - Intensive Care Coordination, NSW

Kaye worked in intensive care for 19 years before moving onto ACI-ICCMU. During this time she held a variety of positions including clinical nurse specialist, nurse educator, clinical nurse unit manager and data manager. In 2004 she moved onto as statewide role as CNC for Knowledge Management for ICCMU. Over the past eight years she has managed a number of successful projects including: redevelopment of the ICCMU webpage to 30 000 visitors per month; shepherding ICUConnect to 1700 members; and the Intensive Care Guidelines Project. These guidelines can be found at IC Wiki. Kaye says the best thing about her ICCMU role has been in getting to know intensive care nurses across NSW and Australia. Kaye has three areas of research and publication. A passion for ensuring critically ill patients receive excellent care has led to publications on oral and eye care. In collaboration with Professor Doug Elliott she has developed a guideline development process using objective consensus methods. Her doctoral research program focuses on how virtual communities can be used to facilitate the dissemination and uptake of knowledge in professional networks. This latter program has led to a social media, Wiki and Twitter addiction (@kaye_rolls or @ICWiki). Kaye is the current vice-president of ACCCN NSW Branch.
 

Manoj SaxenaDr. Manoj Saxena
Research Fellow, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW
Intensive Care Physician, St. George Hospital Clinical School, Sydney, NSW

Dr. Manoj Saxena graduated in England from the University of London and the University of Cambridge in 1993 (MB, Bchir) and also completed a Bsc (Hon) in Immunology. He currently holds appointments as a Research Fellow at The George Institute for Global Health, and as an Intensive Care Physician at St. George Hospital Clinical School in Sydney, Australia (University of New South Wales). His primary research interests include the relationship between hyperthermia after acute brain pathology and sepsis and recovery after critical illness. Other key areas include the design and conduct of large-scale pragmatic (observational and interventional) clinical trials and the refinement of outcome measures for phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials for critically ill patients. Dr Saxena is also an examiner for the College of Intensive Care Medicine and Chair of the Scientific Program for the St. George and Sutherland Symposium. I am married and have two children (7 and 9), and I would like to be a good enough guitar player to play in a band!
 

Alvin Teo Yeng HokDr. Alvin Teo Yeng Hok
Anaesthetist and Intensivist, Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore
Visiting Consultant, National University Hospital, Jurong Health Services & Changi General Hospital, Singapore

Dr Alvin Teo is an anaesthetist and intensivist working in both private and public hospitals in Singapore. His main areas of interests are point-of-care ultrasound and has special interest in ultrasound's utility in assessment of the circulatory system. He was a consultant at the Alfred Hospital ICU in Melbourne till last year when he returned to Singapore. He furthered his interest in ultrasonography by completing the DDU (Critical Care) in 2011.

He now keeps up to date by teaching ultrasonography to Anaesthesia and Intensive Care trainees in Singapore as well as discussing cases with cardiologists and intensivists both formally and informally.
 

David TuxenA/Prof. David Tuxen
Senior Intensivist, Alfred Hospital, VIC

David Tuxen is the Senior Intensivist and the immediate past Director of the Department of Intensive Care and Hyperbaric Medicine at the Alfred Hospital. He is a past President of ANZICS, past Chairman of the Intensive Care Foundation, a past supervisor of RACP intensive care training and has received ANZICS Medal, given the ANZICS Oration and been placed on the ANZICS Honour roll and received the Randy Chestnut award for academic contribution to the Clinical Trials Group. He has convened all the Alfred ICU Advanced Mechanical Ventilation Conferences since their inception in 2007. Expertise and special interests include mechanical ventilation of asthma and ARDS, lung recruitment, ventilator waveforms, independent lung ventilation, fungal infection in critical illness and intensive care ethics.
 

Bala VenkateshProf. Bala Venkatesh

Bala Venkatesh is a Professor of Intensive Care Medicine at the University of Queensland, Honorary Professor at the University of Sydney, a Pre-Eminent specialist in Intensive Care Medicine at the Princess Alexandra Hospital and Deputy Director of Intensive Care Medicine at the Wesley Hospital. He is also the Vice-President for the College of Intensive Care Medicine (ANZ). He is the Principal Investigator of the NHMRC funded multi-center international ADRENAL trial and his research interests include glucocorticoid physiology in critical illness including the development of the idea of the "sick euadrenal state", sepsis and vitamin D in critical illness. He also pioneered the development of a continuous blood gas monitoring system. He supervises 3 PhD students and has been the recipient of several grants from foundations and industry.
 

Paul YoungDr. Paul Young
ICU Specialist, Wellington Hospital, New Zealand
Senior Research Fellow, Medical Research Institute of New Zealand

Dr. Paul Young is an ICU Specialist at Wellington Hospital and a Senior Research Fellow at the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand. He is an active member of the ANZICS Clinical Trials Group. Paul's primary research interest is the design and conduct of multicentre trials in Intensive Care Medicine. He has published more than 30 peer-reviewed publications in the last three years and has received more than three million dollars in funding from competitive funding agencies. He is the Chief Investigator for the HEAT trial (paracetamol vs. placebo in ICU patients with fever and infection), the HOT OR NOT trial (titrated oxygen vs. standard care following out of hospital cardiac arrest), and the SPLIT study (a cluster cross over study of 0.9% Saline vs Plasma-lyte® 148 for fluid therapy in ICU). Paul is married and has three children (a three year old, a five year old, and a seven year old). He prefers kite surfing to working.
 

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Invited Speakers - Paediatric Program

Melissa BloomerMs. Melissa Bloomer
Lecturer & PhD Candidate, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, VIC

Melissa Bloomer is a Lecturer in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Monash University. Melissa's nursing career spans almost 20 years in acute care settings and Intensive Care, and her career in research began 5 years ago, resulting in more than 30 publications in this time. Melissa's PhD investigated how nurses recognised dying and how they responded to the dying patient in an acute care setting. Melissa's ICU research interests focus on communication issues and cultural influences at the end of life, withdrawal and withholding of life-sustaining treatments, nurse preparation and coping in caring for the dying and organisational impediments to ideal care of the dying in Intensive Care. Most recently, Melissa has investigated how nurses care for the family and manage a death in paediatric and neonatal ICU settings.
 

Monica BrookDr. Monica Brook
Registrar, Royal Children's Hospital, VIC

Dr. Brook is a paediatrician senior trainee from the Colonial War Memorial Hospital in Suva, Fiji Islands, and is the first in my country to train in paediatric intensive care. Dr Brook is currently working at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne. The Paediatric hospital in Suva consists of general paediatric wards, a neonatal intensive care unit and a six bed paediatric intensive care unit. We see a range of illnesses common in transitional countries where tropical illnesses and illnesses of poverty merge with diseases of modern life. The diseases are many and at times complex and as such the role of the paediatric intensive care involves doing the best we can with limited resources.
 

Mike CliffordDr. Mike Clifford
Consultant Anaesthetist & Paediatric Intensivist, The Royal Children's Hospital, VIC

Dr. Michael Clifford is a Paediatric Intensivist and Cardiac Anaesthetist from the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. He has an interest in Extracorporeal Life Support, Critical Care Ultrasound and PICU Outreach. He has been responsible as the Chair of the Pain and Sedation Special Interest Group for local development of sedation protocols. He is an examiner for the College of Intensive Care Medicine for both the Paediatric and Primary Examinations where he torments candidates with questions about morphine pharmacology and delirium.
 

David CloseyDr. David Closey
Specialist Intensivist & Anaesthetist, Royal Darwin Hospital, NT

David graduated from The University of Auckland, New Zealand. He trained in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care in Hamilton New Zealand, as well as Darwin and Melbourne Australia. He is currently a Staff Specialist and Supervisor of Training at Royal Darwin Hospital's Intensive Care Unit. As well as involvement in education and Echocardiography, he has a particular interest in the care and management of Paediatric Intensive Care patients in Adult (mixed) Intensive Care Units.
 

Peter DargavilleA/Prof. Peter Dargaville
Director Neonatal/Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Hobart Hospital, TAS

A/Prof. Dargaville trained in Neonatology at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, and at the University of California, San Francisco. His training included a two year full-time research project looking at pulmonary surfactant and its abnormalities in ventilated infants with lung disease, for which he was awarded an MD from the University of Melbourne in 2000. He now continues as a clinician-researcher at the Royal Hobart Hospital and University of Tasmania. The major focus of his research is the development and implementation of new therapies for neonatal lung disease. His endeavours have led to the completion of an NHMRC-funded multinational clinical trial on surfactant lavage therapy in meconuim aspiration syndrome, and more recently to the commencement of a randomised controlled trial of minimally invasive surfactant therapy in preterm infants with hyaline membrane disease. Other projects include elucidation of the physiological principles of neonatal mechanical ventilation, optimisation of lung volume during high frequency oscillatory ventilation, and development of feedback control systems in NICU.
 

Tony De PaoliDr. Tony De Paoli
Staff Specialist Neonatologist, Neonatal and Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmania
Senior Clinical Lecturer, University of Tasmania

Tony is a neonatologist based at the Neonatal and Paediatric Intensive Care Unit at the Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmania. He is a clinical researcher contributing to the field of respiratory support for newborns. He is a principal investigator for the OPTIMIST Trial, a study of minimally invasive surfactant therapy for very preterm infants, and is an associate investigator for several other completed and ongoing NHMRC funded multicenter trials in neonatology, including the ProPrems Neuro Study and the ASTEROID Trial. He is the lead researcher on a local study, collaborating with the School of Pharmacy at the University of Tasmania, examining the proteomic profile in preterm infants with late onset sepsis. He is a contributor to the Cochrane Library as an author of several systematic reviews in the area of neonatal respiratory support. He is the current Tasmanian representative for the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand.
 

Yves d'UdekemA/Prof. Yves d'Udekem
Deputy Director - Cardiac Surgery Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital, VIC

Dr. d'Udekem was born in Canada of Belgian parents. He lived most of his early life in Belgium and graduated as Medical Doctor in 1987 from the Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. He graduated surgeon in Belgium with overseas training in South Africa, Canada and the UK. In 2003 he completed his PhD and moved to Australia to work as consultant in the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne. His research focuses on long-term outcomes after congenital heart surgery.
 

Simon EricksonDr. Simon Erickson
Paediatric Intensivist, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, WA

Simon Erickson is a staff specialist in intensive care at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Western Australia. He is currently chair of the Paediatric Study Group of the ANZICS CTG and is also on the board of examiners for the College of Intensive Care Medicine. His interests are in clinical research, use of echocardiography in PICU, acute care teaching (PALS, EMAC) and the role that intensive care units in developed countries can play in assisting the under-resourced intensive care units in developing countries. He has been involved in volunteer work with Operation Open Heart in Papua New Guinea.
 

Janine EvansMs. Janine Evans
Clinical Nurse Consultant, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne
Nurse Educator & Coordinator, International Children's Heart Foundation

Janine has worked in Paediatric Intensive Care at the Royal Children's Hospital (Melbourne) for twenty years. Her current role as Clinical Nurse Consultant for PICU aims to improve clinical practice with a focus on guidelines, quality and safety and research. She has previously held roles of Clinical Nurse Educator and Associate Unit Manager in PICU, as well as lecturer at The University of Melbourne. Janine's areas of interest are cardiac surgery, resuscitation, education and quality & safety. Janine also works for International Children's Heart Foundation as a Nurse Educator and Coordinator, teaching paediatric cardiac ICU nursing skills in a variety of international settings.
 

Fenella GillMs. Fenella Gill
PhD Candidate & Part Time Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, WA
PICU Nurse Educator, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, WA

Fenella Gill is a full time PhD candidate and part time lecturer at Curtin University. Her PhD study aims to develop critical care course graduate practice standards and a clinical assessment tool. Fenella is on leave from her position as PICU Nurse Educator at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children in Perth. She is Chair of the ACCCN Paediatric Advisory Panel and represents ACCCN on the board of the World Federation of Paediatric Intensive Care Societies. Fenella's current main research interests include practice standards and assessment in critical care nursing education, as well as promoting a patient and family centred care approach in the adult critical care setting.
 

Jonathan GillisA/Prof. Jonathan Gillis
National Medical Director, Organ and Tissue Authority, ACT

Associate Professor Jonathan Gillis is the National Medical Director for the Organ and Tissue Authority. Prior to taking up this position in 2011, Jonathan was the State Medical Director for New South Wales, with DonateLife NSW in 2010. Before joining the DonateLife Network, Jonathan had a long career in Paediatric Intensive Care. He trained in paediatrics and paediatric intensive care in Sydney and Toronto, Canada and for more than 14 years held the position of Director of the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit at the Children's Hospital at Camperdown and then when it moved to Westmead. He is also qualified as a palliative care physician and worked with the palliative care team at the Children's Hospital and at Bear Cottage. He is a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Sydney and has a PhD in the History and Philosophy of Science from the University of New South Wales. Widely published, Jonathan has been an invited speaker at international conferences on intensive care issues, end of life care and ethics. Jonathan is a Visiting Scholar at the Plunkett Centre of Ethics at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney.
 

Hamish JacksonDr. Hamish Jackson
Neonatologist & PICU Trainee, Royal Hobart Hospital, TAS

Dr Hamish Jackson is dual trainee in neonatology and paediatric intensive care medicine. He undertook these specialisations in Melbourne and has recently moved to Tasmania to complete his NPICU, and is now undertaking an anaesthetics rotation. His recent research interests include new advances in non-invasive respiratory support, and the contrasting professional approaches among different intensive care providers towards complex patients and the attendant ethical challenges.
 

Tina KendrickTina Kendrick
NSW Newborn and Paediatric Emergency Transport Service (NETS)

Tina Kendrick completed her nurse training at the Royal Hobart Hospital before moving to NSW and discovering the wonderful world of paediatric intensive care. Tina is currently the Clinical Nurse Consultant - Paediatrics at NETS NSW. Tina has been practicing, teaching and researching in paediatrics and critical care for many years. She has co-authored book chapters and journal articles on critically ill children, competency standards and credentialing for specialist critical care nurses, and transition to specialty practice. Her current research is focussed on clinical practices (e.g. cuffed ETT management in children, high flow oxygen therapy, clinical handover) in paediatric critical care settings, particularly in the retrieval environment.
 

Siva NamachivayamDr. Siva Namachivayam
Consultant in Paediatric Intensive Care, Royal Children's Hospital, VIC

Dr Siva Namachivayam is a Consultant in Paediatric Intensive Care at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne and a researcher in the Intensive Care research group at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute. He trained in Paediatric Intensive Care at AlderHey Children's Hospital Liverpool and at Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne and completed his fellowship training in 2010. His main areas of interest are in Paediatric Cardiac Intensive Care and Outcomes of children following ICU admission. His current research work involves looking at survival and long-term functional outcomes of children who require prolonged intensive care admission after cardiac surgery and studying the Epidemiology of Paediatric Chronic Critical Illness in Australia.
 

Peter RoeleveldDr. Peter Roeleveld
Pediatric Intensivist, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands

Peter was initially trained in general pediatrics at the ErasmusMC/Sophia children's hospital in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. After qualifying as consultant pediatrician in 2005 he went on to sub specialize in Pediatric Intensive Care at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, from 2005 to 2008. After qualifying in January 2009 he became a consultant at the pediatric intensive care unit at the Leiden University Medical Center where he is the director of the cardiac ECMO program. His current research focuses on (postoperative) heart failure and pharmacokinetics, mainly of Levosimendan. Further interests are postoperative care of congenital heart defects, ventilator associated pneumonia and pulmonary mechanics. He also works as locum consultant at the Hospital for Sick Children (Yorkhill) in Glasgow, Scotland.
 

Andreas SchiblerA/Prof. Andreas Schibler
Paediatric Intensive Care Staff Specialist FCICM, Mater Health Services and The University of Queensland, QLD

Andreas Schibler has been working in Australia as a paediatric staff specialist since 2002 after completing his fellowships in Paediatrics, Paediatric Medicine and Paediatric Intensive Care. Three distinct research and clinical areas have been covered by Andreas Schibler over the last two decades: clinical studies, experimental work and introduction of novel clinical practices. Schibler has published over 55 peer reviewed studies and 5 book chapters and monographs. Since his appointment to the Mater Health Service Schibler has been instrumental in the introduction of new respiratory support systems over the last 10 years. Most of these changes were based on own research projects which led to changes in clinical practice. Schibler has developed a major aspect of electrical impedance tomography in paediatrics. In several studies Schibler has measured the changes in ventilation that occur during intubation and mechanical ventilation. These studies showed that the current teaching of paediatric ventilation distribution needs to be adapted for these findings. Several of these publications are now accepted as the gold standard of paediatric respiratory physiology. Schibler is one of the internationally recognised leaders in the field of electrical impedance tomography and monitoring of ventilation in paediatrics. He is frequently invited to speak at conferences, workshops and specific round table discussions in his field of expertise. In his research role Schibler has participated and collaborated with many researchers nationally and internationally. Schibler is an active member of several research collaborations, including European Respiratory Society Paediatric Respiratory and Intensive Care Group, the EIT interest group, the Swiss Australian Academic Network (SAAN) in addition to the Paediatric Study Group (CTG). Schibler is appointed by the University of Queensland as Associated Professor and has been leading several PhD thesis and Master projects. And if not found in his office writing papers or grant application, Schibler can be found on his beloved bicycle somewhere in the Brisbane hinterland.
 

Kimbra ThomasMs. Kimbra Thomas
Clinical Nurse Educator, Neonatal Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, The Royal Hobart Hospital, TAS

Kimbra trained as a general nurse and midwife at the Royal Hobart Hospital. She has many years experience as a neonatal nurse and became interested in Paediatric Intensive Care when the NICU at the Royal Hobart Hospital became a combined NICU/PICU. She now works as clinical nurse educator with the Practice Development Unit at the Royal Hobart Hospital.
 

Chris WilliamsDr. Chris Williams
Paediatrician and Paediatric Intensivist, Royal Hobart Hospital, TAS

Dr. Williams trained in Paediatrics and Paediatric Intensive Care in UK and Adelaide with over three years in developing world settings (Sudan and Vanuatu). Previous Consultant posts in Leeds, UK and Whangarei, New Zealand. Interests in interface of general paediatrics and critical care, high dependency care, paediatric and neonatal retrieval and paediatrics in resource poor and remote settings.

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Global Rising Star Presenters

Sponsored by:
Baxter         ANZICS
 

Taka-aki NakadaA/Prof. Taka-aki Nakada
Critical Care Physician/Surgeon and Investigator, Chiba University
Hospital and Senshu Trauma and Critical Care Center, Japan
Associate Professor, Chiba University, Japan

Dr. Taka-aki Nakada received his medical degree from Chiba University School of Medicine, Japan (1999) and trained in Surgery and Critical Care Medicine. He received his PhD from Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine (2006). His first faculty position was as an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Chiba University (2007). He moved to University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada as a postdoctoral research fellow, working with Dr. Keith Walley and Dr. James Russell (2008-2011). Since 2011, he has been a practicing critical care physician/surgeon and investigator at Chiba University hospital and Senshu Trauma and Critical Care Center. He is an Associate Professor at Chiba University (2013). The focus of Dr. Nakada’s research is to investigate the impact of genotype on patient outcomes in sepsis and systemic inflammatory states. He collaborates with Dr. Keith Walley and Dr. James A. Russell at University of British Columbia on clinical trials involving critically ill patients to translate basic discoveries into clinical practice in the ICU.
 

Danny McAuleyProf. Danny McAuley
Professor and Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine, Royal Victoria Hospital and Queen’s University of Belfast, Ireland

Prof. Danny McAuley is Professor and Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine at the Royal Victoria Hospital and Queen's University of Belfast. His major research areas are acute lung injury and clinical trials.
 

 
 

Christopher SeymourChristopher Seymour
Assistant Professor, Departments of Critical Care & Emergency Medicine, USA
Core Faculty, Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness (CRISMA) Center, USA
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA

Dr. Seymour is Assistant Professor of Critical Care and Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. He is core faculty member in the Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness (CRISMA) Center in the Department of Critical Care, where he contributes to the Programs on Critical Care Health Policy and Clinical Epidemiology. He spends his clinical time attending the Medical Intensive Care Unit at UPMC-Mercy Hospital. He is affiliated faculty in the Center for Research on Emergency Medical Services (CREMS) in the Center for Emergency Medical Services of Western Pennsylvania. Dr. Seymour received his undergraduate degree from Duke University, medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania before completing his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He then completed a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Washington, where he obtained masters degree in clinical epidemiology at the University of Washington, School of Public Health.

Dr. Seymour's research program focuses on the organization of critical care during pre-hospital care – particularly the development of early diagnostic and prognostic models to facilitate allocation of patients and early treatments for those with acute illness. Specifically, he seeks to develop a research and acute care paradigm for pre-hospital sepsis similar that for acute cardiovascular disease. His work has been published in JAMA, Health Services Research, and American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, Society of Critical Care Medicine, American Heart Association, and Seattle MedicOne Foundation.
 

Kenneth BaillieDr. Kenneth Baillie

Kenneth Baillie graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a BSc in Physiology in 1999 and MBChB (Medical degree) in 2002. After junior house officer jobs in the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, he undertook a rotational training programme in hospital medicine at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow, before being appointed to a training scheme in anaesthesia and critical care medicine in South East Scotland. During this time he led a series of high altitude research projects, involving several expeditions to Bolivia, and ran a charity, Apex (altitude physiology expeditions).

He was appointed as a clinical lecturer on the ECAT (Edinburgh Clinical Academic Track) at the University of Edinburgh in 2008. His research interest is the genetics of host susceptibility to severe infection. He led the GenISIS (Genetics of Influenza Susceptibility in Scotland) study and the host genetics component of the MOSAIC (Mechanisms of Severe Influenza Consortium) study. He is the working group chair for genomics, pathogenesis and pharmacology for the International Severe Acute Respiratory Infection Consortium (ISARIC).
 

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Workshops

Quality Control in Echocardiography

ECHO Workshop 1:
Friday 18 October 2013
10.45 - 12.15

ECHO Workshop 2:
Friday 18 October 2013
13.45 - 15.15

Arguably the most important workshop on echocardiography you will ever undertake. This 90 minute session aims to improve the quality of your clinical application and use of this valuable skill. Participants will have a work station to view and analyse images whilst receiving guidance and recommendations on quality assurance with use of echocardiography performed by you in your ICU. We are grateful to benefit from facilitation by Professor Tom Marwick and Dr. Robyn Moss, who both have extensive experience and research in this area.

Numbers are limited so book early to secure a position in this unique workshop experience.

Facilitators: Prof. Tom Marwick & Dr. Robyn Moss
 

Early Mobilisation for Ventilated Patients:
Practical Strategies for a Team-Based Approach

Friday 18 October 2013
15.30 - 17.30

This 2 hour workshop provides hands-on training for nursing, medical and allied health staff to practice safe mobilisation and rehabilitation skills in a simulated ICU environment. In small groups, participants will develop skills in using gait harnesses, tilt tables, lifters and other equipment to optimise early rehabilitation for ventilator-dependent patients. There will also be discussion on strategies to overcome barriers to early mobilisation, and the equipment requirements for safe early rehabilitation in the ICU setting.

No prior experience is required, but experienced staff are also welcome to share their ideas. Groups from individual ICUs are also welcome to book in together and take new strategies back to change your unit's practice.

Facilitators: Bernie Bissett, Margot Green, Alison Kingsbury & Dr. Anne Leditschke
 

Intra-Aortic Balloon Counterpulsation Skills Workshop

Saturday 19 October 2013
08.30 - 10.00

Managing the IABP at the bedside is a core ICU skill that many of us have few opportunities to use. This workshop is aimed at clinicians with some experience in counterpulsation therapy, who would like to improve and sharpen their skills in assessing and managing IABP timing and at troubleshooting the multitude of problems that can arise.
 

Non-Invasive Ventilation Workshop

Saturday 19 October 2013
10.45 - 12.15

Managing non-invasive ventilation is quite a different skill to managing invasive ventilation. This may be influenced by the dynamic nature of the patient-ventilator interaction, and is related to many factors including lack of sedation.

This workshop is aimed at clinicians familiar with principles of positive pressure ventilation, who wish to extend their skills into the realms of non-invasive ventilation. It aims to provide knowledge, skills and techniques to improve success rates for NIV therapy in your ICU.
 

Breakfast Session 1

Friday 18 October 2013

Early Nutritional Support in Critical Illness: Evidence, Pathophysiology and Costs
Proudly sponsored by Baxter Healthcare
Baxter Healthcare

Dr. Gordon Doig, Associate Professor in Intensive Care, Northern Clinical School and Head, Northern Clinical School Intensive Care Research Unit University of Sydney - Royal North Shore Hospital

This session will provide an objective systematic overview of the clinical and physiological evidence supporting the effects of early nutrition therapy in critical illness. Insights into the most recent clinical evidence from RCTs and meta-analyses will be provided, along with a discussion of potential mechanisms of action based on laboratory models of critical illness. Autophagocytocis of Paneth cells in the gut, leading to bacterial translocation, and proteolysis of the diaphragm, leading to prolonged ventilation, will be considered.
 

Breakfast Session 2

Friday 18 October 2013

Chlorhexidine - Is it Time to Defend or De-friend?
Proudly sponsored by Mayo Healthcare
Mayo Healthcare

Prof Cathryn Murphy RN, MPH, PhD, CIC, CICP. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University and Executive Director, Infection Control Plus Pty Ltd, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

Recent Australian clinical and economic research highlights the high incidence, substantial avoidable costs and preventability of central line associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) among intensive care unit patients. 1-3 Extensive global use of Chlorhexidine (CHX)-impregnated central venous catheters (CHX-CVCs) since the early 1990s has demonstrated their clinical and economic impact in CLABSI prevention. Their routine use in patients with an anticipated dwell time of longer than 5-8 days is recommended when other combined routine measures such as education, aseptic insertion and use of CHG skin preparation fail to reduce the CLABSI rate. 4, 5 Clinician concern about CHX's safety and efficacy is however unnecessarily impacting use of these devices and perhaps placing ICU patients at increased risk of CLABSI. 6, 7 The purpose of this presentation is to present a balanced view of the role of CHX in infection prevention by reviewing its spectrum of activity and widespread use. Chlorhexidine sensitivity and susceptibility will also be addressed.
 

Breakfast Session 3

Friday 18 October 2013

Respiratory Research in Critical Care
Proudly sponsored by Kimberly-Clark
Kimberly-Clark

John F Fraser, Amy J Spooner, Lawrence R Caruana - Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital and University of Queensland, Brisbane
Carol Hodgson - School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Melbourne
David Tuxen - Intensive Care Unit, The Alfred, Victoria, Melbourne

Whilst mechanical ventilation is a life saving measure, it is also associated with respiratory complications leading to prolonged mechanical ventilation times, extended intensive care and hospital stays and increased costs to the healthcare system. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a bedside monitoring tool that enables researchers to examine the impact of standard care (e.g. suctioning) and protective ventilation strategies (e.g. recruitment manoeuvres) on lung volumes and ventilation distribution in mechanically ventilated patients. This interactive session will outline strategies to recruit and/or minimise de-recruitment in the lungs using EIT and will offer recommendations to translate these approaches into clinical practice.
 

Breakfast Session 4

Friday 18 October 2013

ECG Tip Confirmation for PICCs... the New Gold Standard?
Proudly sponsored by Bard Australia
Bard Australia

Ms Fiona Stewart CNC Vascular Access Team, Westmead Hospital
Ms Letti Leroux CNC Vascular Access Team, St Vincent's
Ms Meron Bower Bard, Clinical Nurse Consultant

Come join our educational breakfast session to learn about the latest in ECG catheter tip confirmation as presented by Australian Clinicians utilising this technology.

Topics relate to improvements in patient care, efficiencies of PICC insertion teams and the related financial impact this technology has afforded health care facilities.

  • Eliminating confirmatory chest x-ray and radiation exposure
  • Locating and navigating the catheter tip in real-time
  • Confirming catheter tip placement at the CAJ
  • Immediate release of line for therapy commencement

To promote ongoing PICC insertion skills, Bard will also be giving away three (3) PeterPICC Educational Anatomical Mannequins during this session.

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Scientific Program

Click here to download program or keep scrolling to see what's in store.

Thursday 17 October 2013
Adult and Paediatric Program

07.45

Registration Opens - Paediatric/Full Meeting Delegates

 

08.30 - 08.35

PAEDIATRIC PLENARY

Welcome & Housekeeping - Dr. Chris Williams & Kimbra Thomas

Technology in PICU

Room: Grand Ballrooms 1 & 2

Chairs

Dr. Johnny Millar & Janine Evans

08.35 - 09.05

09.05 - 09.35

09.35 - 10.00

Can Technology Make PICU a Safer Place? - Dr. Peter Laussen

Simulation: Beyond Crisis Resource Management - A/Prof. Elaine Meyer

What Technology Can't Do - A/Prof. Jonathan Gillis

10.00 - 10.45

Trade Display, Posters & Morning Tea

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

10.45 - 12.00

PAEDIATRIC MEDICAL CONCURRENT SESSION

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

 

PAEDIATRIC NURSING CONCURRENT SESSION

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

Chairs

Dr. Geoff Knight

 

Dr. Jacqueline Jauncey-Cooke & Sharon Rootes

 

10.45 - 11.10
 

11.10 - 11.35
 

11.35 - 12.00
 

Kids Gone Wild

Baby Spice
Dr. Debbie Long

The Wild Child
Dr. Mike Clifford

Born to be Wild: Challenges and Controversies in
Neonatal Sedation

Dr. Tony de Paoli

 

10.45 - 11.10
 

11.10 - 11.35
 
 

11.35 - 12.00
 

Kids Gone Wild

Establishing a PICU in Tasmania
Kimbra Thomas

Paediatric Critical Care Education in Remote and Rural Areas -
A NSW Perspective

Tina Kendrick

PICU Nurse Education: Is there any Difference?
Fenella Gill

12.00 - 12.45

Trade Display, Posters & Lunch

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

12.45 - 14.45

 

12.45 - 12.50
12.50 - 12.55
12.55 - 13.00

OPENING PLENARY

Official Opening

Welcome & Housekeeping
President ACCCN - Prof. Paul Fulbook
President ANZICS - A/Prof. Mary White

Walk on the Wild Side

Chairs

Prof. Paul Fulbrook & A/Prof. Andrew Turner

13.00 - 13.40

13.40 - 14.40

14.45 - 14.45

Going to Extremes to Understand Critical Illness - Kay Mitchell

The Thylacine and Lazarus Projects: When Intensive Care Fails, does Extinction have to be Forever? - Prof. Mike Archer

Q&A

14.45 - 15.30

Trade Display, Posters & Afternoon Tea

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

15.30 - 17.30

COMBINED MEDICAL SESSION

Room: Concert Hall

 

COMBINED NURSING SESSION

Room: Grand Ballrooms 1 & 2

Chairs

A/Prof. Stephen Jacobe & Dr. Colin McArthur

 

Anita Booker & Dr. Hugh Davies

 

15.30 - 15.55
 

15.55 - 16.20
 

16.20 - 16.45
 
 

16.45 - 17.10
 

17.10 - 17.30

Back to the Wild World: The Impact of Surviving Critical Illness

Paediatric Sepsis in the Developing World
Dr. Tex Kissoon

Long Term Outcomes from Sepsis in the Developed World
Dr. Jack Iwashyna

Unacceptable Badness: Ethics and Outcomes from
Traumatic Brain Injury

Stephen Honeybul

Improved Survival in Congenital Heart Disease: What Next?
Dr. Peter Laussen

Q&A

 

15.30 - 16.10
 

16.10 - 16.50
 

16.50 - 17.30
 

Walking a Fine Line: Difficult Decisions in Critical Situations

Working in the Space between Life and Death
Dr. Maureen Coombs

The Challenging Conversation
A/Prof. Elaine Meyer

Life and Death at the End of a Rope
Kay Mitchell

17.30 - 19.00

Trade Display & Welcome Cocktails

Room: Federation Ballroom & Foyers

19.30 - 23.00

Paediatric Dinner

Venue: Frogmore Creek

 

FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER 2013
Adult and Paediatric Program

07.15 - 08.15

BREAKFAST SESSION
Room: Grand Ballroom 1

BREAKFAST SESSION
Room: Grand Ballroom 2

BREAKFAST SESSION
Room: Grand Ballroom 3

BREAKFAST SESSION
Room: Chancellor 6

Early Nutritional Support in Critical Illness: Evidence, Pathophysiology and Costs

Dr. Gordon Doig

Baxter

Chlorhexidine - Is it Time to Defend or De-Friend?

Prof. Cathryn Murphy

Mayo Healthcare

Respiratory Research in Critical Care

Prof. John Fraser, Amy Spooner, Lawrence Caruana, Dr. Carol Hodgson & A/Prof. David Tuxen

Kimberly-Clark

ECG Tip Confirmation for PICCs... the New Gold Standard?

Ms Fiona Stewart
CNC Vascular Access Team, Westmead Hospital

Ms Letti Leroux
CNC Vascular Access Team, St Vincent's Hospital

Ms Meron Bower
Bard, Clinical Nurse Consultant

Bard

07.45

Registration Opens

08.30 - 10.00

NURSING

Room: Concert Hall

MEDICAL

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

CLINICAL TRIALS

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

PAEDIATRICS

Room: Chancellor 6

PAEDIATRICS

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

Chairs

Melanie Greenwood

Prof. John Fraser &
Dr. Jonathan Buckmaster

Dr. David Cooper &
Dr. Peter Lavercombe

A/Prof. Jonathan Gillis

Dr Michael Clifford

 

A Balancing Act: Patient and Family Centred Care

How Much Should I Trust my own ECHO?

Fluid Resuscitation: Drown or Dehydrate?

At the Wild Journey's End: A Case Based Panel Discussion Around End of Life Decisions

A Wild Ride: The Multiple Challenges of a Single Ventricle

 

08.30 - 09.00

Family Centred Care in the ICU: Controversies and Conundrums
Prof. Andrea Marshall

09.00 - 09.30

Family Witnessed Resuscitation
Prof. Paul Fulbrook

09.30 - 10.00

Death Matters: Working with those Left Behind
Dr. Maureen Coombs

08.30 - 08.55

The Expanding Use of ECHO by Intensivists
Dr. Robyn Moss

08.55 - 09.25

Quality Control of ECHO use by Bedside Clinicians
Prof. Tom Marwick

09.25 - 09.50

How much should I Trust my own ECHO?
Dr. Alvin Teo Yeng Hok

09.50 - 10.00

Q&A

08.30 - 09.00

The Impact of the CHEST Trial
Dr. David Gattas

09.00 - 09.30

Current and Future Trials in Fluid Resuscitation
Dr. Manoj Saxena

09.30 - 10.00

SPLIT: 0.9% Saline vs Plasmalyte for ICU Fluid Therapy
Dr. Paul Young

08.30 - 10.00

Panel:
A/Prof. Elaine Meyer
Melissa Bloomer
Dr. Hamish Jackson

08.30 - 08.50

Lessons from the SVR Trial
Dr. Peter Laussen

08.50 - 09.10

Hybrid Approach to Stage One Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
Dr. Peter Roeleveld

09.10 - 09.30

Resource Utilization by Infants with Univentricular Lesions
Dr. Siva Namachivayam

09.30 - 09.50

Life with a Fontan
A/Prof. Yves D'udekem

09.50 - 10.00

Q&A

10.00 - 10.45

Trade Display, Posters & Morning Tea

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

10.45 - 12.15

COMBINED
PAEDIATRIC & ADULT

Room: Concert Hall

MEDICAL

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

CLINICAL TRIALS

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

MULTIDISCIPLINARY

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

NURSING

Room: Chancellor 6

Chairs

Amy Johansen &
Dr. Simon Erickson

Dr. Benjamin Reddi &
Dr. Nick Edwards

Dr. Stewart Moodie &
Dr. Matthew Brain

Jenni Pyefinch &
Dr. Carol Hodgson

Melanie Greenwood

 

Respiratory Failure across the Ages: Open Lungs for Everyone?

I Haven't Read a Journal in Two Years: What can I Learn in 90 Minutes?

Nutrition Trials: Famine or Feast?

Walking Wild: Early Mobilisation & Physical Therapy in the ICU

Walking the Tightrope of Quality and Safety

 

10.45 - 11.10

Concepts of Lung Recruitment and their Application in the Newborn
A/Prof. Peter Dargaville

11.10 - 11.35

Lung Recruitment in Children: Necessity or Fad?
A/Prof. Andreas Schibler

11.35 - 12.00

The Future of Recruitment: Beyond ARDS
A/Prof. David Tuxen

12.00 - 12.15

Q&A

10.45 - 12.15

Back by popular demand, this comprehensive journal update will deliver the latest and greatest, state of the art, high impact research and new ideas that are bound to influence your practice.

Speakers to include:
Dr. Mike Anderson
Dr. Adam Deane
Prof. Bala Venkatesh

10.45 - 11.05

Current Controversies in Nutrition: An Overview
Dr. Richard Beale

11.05 - 11.25

The TARGET Pilot Trial Results
Steph O'Connor

11.25 - 11.45

Future CTG Trials of Nutrition
A/Prof. Marianne Chapman

11.45 - 12.00

Summary and Overview of CTG Activities
Dr. Colin McArthur

12.00 - 12.15

IRCIG Update
Rachael Parke

10.45 - 11.05

The Impact of Early Mobilisation: The Story so Far
Dr. Jack Iwashyna

11.05 - 11.25

Changing Culture and Encouraging Innovation - A Nurse's Perspective
Alison Kingsbury

11.25 - 11.35

Sports Medicine Meets ICU: Why you Should Train your Patient Like an Athlete
Bernie Bissett

11.35 - 11.45

Mission Impossible? Mobilising the Morbidly Obese in ICU
Margot Green

11.45 - 12.05

Waking the (Nearly) Dead - Sedation, Delirium and Barriers to Early Mobilisation: Overcoming the Big Challenges
Dr. Anne Leditschke

12.05 - 12.15

Q&A

10.45 - 11.15

The Knowledge Translation Continuum in ICU: Scientific Discovery to Improved Patient Outcomes
Prof. Andrea Marshall

11.15 - 11.45

Blood Sampling from Arterial Lines: Accurate Results without Iatrogenic Anaemia
Prof. Claire Rickard

11.45 - 12.15

Medication Conversations with Families
Prof. Elizabeth Manias

12.15 - 13.45

Trade Display, Posters & Lunch

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

13.05 - 14.15

Adult Medical Oral Posters

Room: Harbour View 2

 

13.05 - 13.15

Oral Poster #1

13.15 - 13.25

Oral Poster #2

13.25 - 13.35

Oral Poster #3

13.35 - 13.45

Oral Poster #4

13.45 - 13.55

Oral Poster #5

13.55 - 14.05

Oral Poster #6

MEDICAL
FREE PAPERS

Room: Concert Hall

PAEDIATRIC
NURSING
FREE PAPERS

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

NURSING
FREE PAPERS
(CARDIOVASCULAR)

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

NURSING
FREE PAPERS
& NURSING
SCHOLARSHIP

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

PAEDIATRIC
MEDICAL
FREE PAPERS

Room: Chancellor 6

Chairs

Dr. Davis Gattas &
Dr. Anthony Holley

Tina Kendrick

Suzy Ladanyi

Michelle Foster

Dr. Peter Laussen

13.45 - 14.00

Half Molar Sodium Lactate Improves Cardiac Function in Acute Heart Failure Patients
Dr. Marek Nalos

The Course of Postraumatic Stress in Children: Examination of Symptom Trajectories Following PICU Admission
Dr. Debbie Long

Implementing a Point of Care Testing (POCT) Service Improves Management of Haemostatic Dysfunction in Cardiac Surgery Patients
Bronwyn Pearse

Patterns of Self-Reported Anxiety in ICU Patients
Maria Castillo

Epidemiology of Paediatric Chronic Critical Illness in Australia and New Zealand
Dr. Siva Namachivayam

14.00 - 14.15

14.05 - 13.15

Oral Poster #7
 

Intermittent Pneumatic Compression to the Lower Limbs is Effective in Reducing Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients: A Stratified Meta-Analysis
A/Prof. Kwok-Ming Ho

Evaluation of a ECLS Nurse-Led Anticoagulation Protocol: A Before & After Study
Amy Johansen

ECMO in an Australian Tertiary ICU: A Four Year Review
Jeff Breeding

The Complexity of Intensive Care Nursing in Response to Possible Patient Pain
Dr. Nerilee Baker

How Does High Flow Treatment Work? A Lesson in Physiology
A/Prof. Andreas Schibler

MEDICAL
FREE PAPERS

Room: Harbour View 2

Chairs

A/Prof. David Tuxen &
Dr. Richard Beale

14.15 - 14.30

Temporal Changes of the Left Ventricular Dimensions and Systolic Function During CPR in Patients with Prolonged Cardiac Arrest
Dr. Oh Hyun Kim

Pulsing the Rotary Blood Pump During Mechanical Circulatory Support May Result in Increased Blood Trauma
Dr. Anthony Yuen

Manipulating Positive End Expiratory Pressure to Recruit Lung Volume in Mechanically Ventilated Children
Dr. Jacqueline Jauncey-Cooke

Comparison of Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Calculation Using Uscom and Transthoracic Echocardiography with an Invasive Continuous Cardiac Output Monitor During VV-ECMO
Sara Diab

Development of Australian Clinical Practice Outcome Standards for Graduates of Critical Care Nurse Education
Fenella Gill

Epidemiology and Outcome of Infections in Children Requiring Admission to Intensive Care in Australia and New Zealand Over the Past Ten Years
Dr. Luregn Schlapbach

14.30 - 14.45

Women are More Than Twice as Likely to Die from Burns as Men in Australia and New Zealand: An Unexpected Finding of the Beam Study
Dr. Edwina Moore

Over 13 Years, ICU Patients have Increasing Comorbidities
A/Prof. John Santamaria

Therapeutic Hypothermia for Newborn Infants with Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy Born In Non-Tertiary Centres In NSW, Australia
Lynn Sinclair

Assessment of the Role of Point of Care Coagulation Testing In Adult ECMO Patients
Susan Whittam

The Experiences of Rural and Remote Families Involved in an Inter-Hospital Transfer to a Tertiary ICU: A Hermeneutic Study
Benjamin Mackie

Longstay PICU Patients Managed by a Specialist Team have Better Outcomes than those Managed Traditionally
Dr. Suparna Chakrabarty

14.45 - 15.00

Genotyping to Identify MRSA Transmission in a Tertiary Care ICU
Dr. Chris Sadler

Ecmo has a Profound Influence On Ciprofloxacin Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Sheep When Compared to Healthy Sheep
A/Prof. Kiran Shekar

Evaluation of Nutrition Support Delivery in Critically Ill Infants and Children on Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation
A/Prof. Andreas Schibler

Fluid Accumulation Post Cardiac Surgery and Risk for Renal Replacement Therapy
Elizabeth Moore

Quality of Life Post Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in One Australian Intensive Care Unit
Belinda Foster

Respiratory Support in Interhospital Transports of Critically Ill Infants - High-Flow Nasal Cannulae Therapy is Safe and May Reduce Intubation Rates
Dr. Luregn Schlapbach

15.00 - 15.15

Citrate Anticoagulation in Continuous Haemofiltration: More Filter Time, Less Filters
Dr. David Gutierrez-Bernays

Dimeric Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin as a Predictor of Sepsis in Critically Ill Patients
Dr. Johan Mårtensson

Introduction of a Track & Trigger System is Associated with Increased Paediatric Intensive Care Outreach Utilisation and a Trend Towards Improved Patient Outcomes in a Tertiary Children's Hospital
Natalie Duns

'True Blood' the Critical Care Story: An Audit of Blood Sampling Practice Across Critcial Care Settings
Samantha Keogh

The Lived Experiences of Graduate Nurses Working in an Intensive Care Unit as First Placement after Graduation: A Phenomenological Study
Asuman Salkaya

Paediatric Sedation and Analgesia Practices in Intensive Care: A National Point Prevalence Study of Ventilated Patients
Dr. Debbie Long

15.15 - 16.00

Trade Display, Posters & Afternoon Tea

Rooms: Harbour Room 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

16.00 - 17.30

MEDICAL

Room: Concert Hall

MEDICAL

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

NURSING & PHARMACY

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

NURSING

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

PAEDIATRICS

Room: Chancellor 6

Chairs

A/Prof. Sandy Peake &
Dr. Richard Beale

Dr. Kwok-Ming Ho &
Dr. Marc Ziegenfuss

Belinda Cooper

Melanie Greenwood &
Tina Kendrick

Dr. Hamish Jackson &
Dr. Tex Kissoon

 

Transfusion Guidelines, Evidence and Critical Care Practice

CORE Issues: Are ANZ ICUs keeping up?

Wet and Wild: Renal Dilemmas

Pecha Kucha: What's Hot and What's Not

My PICU, My Challenges

 

16.00 - 16.20

How Safe is our Blood?
Prof. James Isbister

16.20 - 16.40

Lessons from the Front Line: How to Stem the Flow
Commander Anthony Holley RANR

16.40 - 17.00

Perioperative Patient Blood Management Guidelines: Implications for Intensive Care
A/Prof. Craig French

17.00 - 17.20

Is Blood Killing or Saving the Cardiac Surgical Patient
Prof. John Fraser

17.20 - 17.30

Q&A

16.00 - 16.25

Does Workload Drive Resources or Vice Versa?
Dr. Jack Iwashyna

16.25 - 16.50

Where are our ICUs Heading - Workforce, Resources & Beds?
Dr. Peter Hicks

16.50 - 17.15

ANZROD: Is this the end of APACHE in ANZ ICUs?
Dr. David Pilcher

17.15 - 17.30

Q&A

16.00 - 16.30

Frequent Clotting during CRRT: Source and Solutions
Prof. Ian Baldwin

16.30 - 17.00

Fluid Balance and the Critically Ill Patient with AKI
Dr. Hugh Davies

17.00 - 17.30

Managing Drug Therapy in Renal Failure - With and Without CRRT
Peter Fowler

16.00 - 16.14

What's Hot, What's Not: 25 Years of Publication in Australian Critical Care*
Prof. Gavin Leslie

16.14 - 16.28

The Latest Research in CVC and IAL Care
Prof. Claire Rickard

16.28 - 16.42

Nutrition in Critical Illness: What is Hot and What is Not
Prof. Andrea Marshall

16.42 - 16.56

What Interventions can Help to Reduce Medication Errors in Intensive Care?
Prof. Elizabeth Manias

16.56 - 17.10

Heat up the ICU: Exercise Improves Survival
Dr. Carol Hodgson

17.10 - 17.30

Q&A

16.00 - 16.15

Darwin: Combined Adult and Paediatric Regional ICU
Dr. David Closey

16.15 - 16.30

Boston and Toronto: Separate Specialised PICU
Dr. Peter Laussen

16.30 - 16.45

Hobart: combined PICU and NICU
Dr. Chris Williams

16.45 - 17.00

Melbourne: Large PICU, Single Patient Rooms
Janine Evans

17.00 - 17.15

Tropical PICU - The Challenges in Paradise
Dr. Monica Brook

17.15 - 17.30

Q&A

17.30 - 18.30

ANZICS AGM     Room: Concert Hall

ACCCN AGM     Room: Grand Ballroom

19.00 - 24.00

Friday Night Party

Venue: MONA

 

SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER 2013
Adult Program

07.45

Registration Opens

08.30 - 10.00

MEDICAL

Room: Concert Hall

MEDICAL

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

NURSING RESEARCH

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

NURSING & PHYSIOTHERAPY

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

Chairs

A/Prof. John Santamaria &
Prof. Jack Iwashyna

Dr. Shay McGuinness &
Dr. Allan Beswick

A/Prof. Marion Mitchell

Cindy Weatherburn

 

Sepsis Guidelines: Applying them in the Real World

When the Heart Fails in the Critically ill, how Important is...

Proudly presented by
Mayo Healthcare

Translational Research 'Applying Research to Practice'

Breathing Easy: Managing Ventilation & Weaning

 

08.30 - 08.55

(How) are Global Sepsis Guidelines Relevant to your Practice?
Dr. Tex Kissoon

08.55 - 09.20

Where are the Holes in the Latest Guidelines?
A/Prof. Sandy Peake

09.20 - 09.45

From Guidelines to Clinical Practice: Will Anything Change?
Dr. Richard Beale

09.45 - 10.00

Q&A

08.30 - 08.50

Diastology
Dr. Andrew Hilton

08.50 - 09.10

Takotsubo Phenomenum
Dr. Alvin Teo Yeng Hok

09.10 - 09.30

Pulmonary Hypertension
Prof. David Kilpatrick

09.30 - 09.50

Your Choice of Pharmacotherapy
Dr. Andrew Hilton

09.50 - 10.00

Q&A

08.30 - 09.00

Developing Clinical-Academic ICU Nursing Research Partnerships that Work
Prof. Claire Rickard

09.00 - 09.30

Investigator Driven Research as a Catalyst for Practice Review
Prof. Gavin Leslie

09.30 - 10.00

Diffusion of Innovation, Social Networks and Healthcare
Kaye Rolls

08.30 - 09.00

Latest Ventilation Strategies and Emerging Trends
Dr. Carol Hodgson

09.00 - 09.30

Inspiratory Muscle Training and Ventilatory Weaning
Bernie Bissett

09.30 - 10.00

Long Term Ventilatory Weaning
Kay Mitchell

10.00 - 10.45

Trade Display, Posters & Morning Tea

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

10.45 - 12.15

FREE PAPERS
(CORE)

Room: Concert Hall

MATT SPENCE
MEDAL FREE PAPERS

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

SAFETY & QUALITY
FREE PAPERS

Room: Grand Ballroom 2

NURSING
FREE PAPERS

Room: Grand Ballroom 3

NURSING FREE
PAPERS & NURSING
SCHOLARSHIP

Room: Chancellor 6

NURSING &
ALLIED HEALTH
FREE PAPERS

Room: Harbour View 2

Chairs

A/Prof. Marianne Chapman &
A/Prof. David Tuxen

A/Prof. Mary White &
A/Prof Andrew Turner

Prof. Jack Cade &
Dr. Richard Beale

Dianne Callahan

Kylie Atwell

Sarah Kelly

10.45 - 11.00

Risk Change: A New Method to Compare Cardiac Surgical Units
Dr. Tim Coulson

Cardiac Arrest in Adult Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Undergoing Veno-Arterial Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation did not Predict Worse Outcome
Dr. Aidan Burrell

The Rising Incidence of VRE Colonisation: A Looming Concern
Dr. Edward Tsoi

Variability of Infusion Preparation in Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Units
Bianca Levkovich

An Evidence Based ICU Specific Minimum Dataset for Bedside Nursing Handover Improves Communication
Amy Spooner

Decompressive Craniectomy for Neurological Emergencies - An Update for Nurses
Stephen Honeybul

11.00 - 11.15

Does Admission to the Intensive Care Unit During after Hours Increase ICU Mortality and Duration of Stay?
Dr. Earlene Silvapulle

Long-Term Outcome and Quality of Life after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Severe Primary Graft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation
Dr. Clement Lee

Incidence of and Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolic and Mechanical Complications Subsequent to Using Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters for Thromboprophylaxis in Patients with Major Trauma
Dr. Kwok-Ming Ho

Measurement of Temperature in Critically Ill Adults: A Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline
Kaye Rolls

Critical Care Nurses' Practices in the Provision of End-of-Life Care
Dr. Kristen Ranse

Performance of Manual Hyperinflation: Consistency and Modification of the Technique by Intensive Care Unit Nurses During Physiotherapy
Diane Dennis

11.15 - 11.30

Using Data Linkage to Follow ICU Patients Beyond Hospital Mortality in Tasmania
Dr. Matthew Brain

Critical Illness Reduces the Enteral Absorption of Long Chain Triglycerides
Dr. Yasmine Ali Abdelhamid

Do we Practise Low Tidal Volume Ventilation In ICU? A 4-Year Audit
A/Prof. John Santamaria

The Greatest Hit: A Case Report of Bivalirudin and Continous-Venovenous Haemodiafiltration
Thuy Bui

Exploring Compassion Fatigue: How Does Compassion Fatigue Affect the Intensive Care Nurse
Amanda Vann

Comprehensive Epidemiology of Bacteriuria in Critically Ill Patients
Dr. Cecile Aubron

11.30 - 11.45

Mortality After ICU Admission - How Low will it Go Over the Next 30 Years?
A/Prof. David Pilcher

Exogenous Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP) does not Effect Gastric Emptying or Glycaemia in Critically Ill Patients
Dr. Palash Kar

Quality of Intensive Care for Older Persons In Victoria
Dr. Graeme Duke

Dialysate Fluid Flow in CVVHD; Does Countercurrent Flow Increase Clearance for Small Solutes?
Prof. Ian Baldwin

The Extent and Application of Patient Diaries in Australian Intensive Care Units: A National Survey
Rajni Nair

Pharmacological Agents for the Prevention of Delirium After Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review
Dr. Jinglan Mu

11.45 - 12.00

The Australian and New Zealand Risk of Death (ANZROD) Model May More Accurately Identify Outlier ICUs than Apache III-j on Funnel Plots of Standardised Mortality Ratios
A/Prof. David Pilcher

EASI - Efforts to Attenuate the Spread of Infection: A Prospective, Observational Multi-Centre Survey of Ultrasound Equipment in Australian Emergency Departments and Intensive Care Units
Beatrice Sim

Retrospective Audit of Resuscitation Planning for High Risk Patients
Andrea Doric

Filter Lifespan in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy (CRRT): The Effect of Patient and Treatment-Related Variables
Wendy Dunn

Predictors of Intensive Care Clinicians' Behaviour Intention for Three Bowel Management Practices
Serena Knowles

Implementing Pre-Printed Infusion Charts in the Intensive Care Unit
Niamh Geraghty

12.00 - 12.15

Long Term Survival Following Severe Neurotrauma: The Rule of Rescue
Stephen Honeybul

GLP-1 Attenuates Hypoglycaemic Acceleration of Gastric Emptying in Healthy Subjects
Dr. Mark Plummer

Does Fast Tracking Critically Ill Patients from the Emergency Department Improve Patient Outcome?
Dr. Ramanan Rajendram

An Interventional Skin Care Protocol (INSPIRE) Reduces Pressure Injuries in Critically Ill Patients in the Intensive Care Unit
A/Prof. Fiona Coyer

The Mortality Associated with Hospital Medical Emergency Calls (Respond Medical Emergency Team or Respond Blue)
Roger Smith

Critical Illness Induced Hyperglycaemia Occurs Frequently in Patients without Pre-Existing Diabetes
Christopher Annink

12.15 - 13.45

Trade Display, Posters & Lunch

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

13.45 - 15.15

A MULTIDISCIPLINARY Q&A

Room: Concert Hall

INTENSIVE CARE GLOBAL RISING STAR PROGRAM

Room: Grand Ballroom 1

MEDICAL

Room: Grand Ballroom 2 & 3

Chairs

Moderated by Dr. Peter Hicks

A/Prof. Mary White & Dr. Adam Deane

Dr. Graeme Duke & Dr. Scott Parkes

 

Who Should Decide: ICU Resource Allocation in an Era of Shrinking Global and Local Economies

Short presentations followed by a Q&A Roundtable, where an expert Multidisciplinary Panel will discuss the complexities of determining who gets an ICU bed.

Proudly presented by
Baxter Healthcare and the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society

Sponsored by Baxter and ANZICS

The Breath-taking Wilderness

 

13.45 - 13.55

Predicting Outcome: Is there any Evidence to Guide Resource Rationing?
Dr. Jack Iwashyna

13.55 - 14.05

Do Patients Really have Capacity?
Fleur Dewhurst

14.05 - 14.15

Can Families Really Decide?
Dr. Maureen Coombs

14.15 - 14.25

Does Doctor Know Best?
Dr. Brent Richards

14.25 - 14.35

The View from Above: How Many ICU Beds do we Actually Need?
Simon Foster

14.35 - 15.15

Q&A: A Multidisciplinary Panel Discussion

13.45 - 14.05

The Impact of Genetic Polymorphisms on the Outcome of Septic Shock
A/Prof. Taka-aki Nakada

14.05 - 14.25

Host: Virus Interactions - Time to Focus on the Host?
Dr. John Kenneth Baillie

14.25 - 14.45

Prehospital Resuscitation is Associated with Reduced Mortality in Severe Sepsis
A/Prof. Christopher Seymour

14.45 - 15.05

Developing a New Therapy for Acute Lung Injury: The Potential Role of Simvastatin
Prof. Daniel F. McAuley

15.05 - 15.15

Q&A

13.45 - 14.10

Oxygen Targets in Mechanically Ventilated Adults: Where do we Aim?
Prof. Rinaldo Bellomo

14.10 - 14.35

Turning Wild: Is Position Important?
A/Prof. David Tuxen

14.35 - 15.00

Fluid Management in Respiratory Illness
Dr. Richard Beale

15.00 - 15.15

Q&A

15.15 - 16.00

Trade Display, Posters & Afternoon Tea

Rooms: Harbour View 1, Federation Ballroom & Foyers

16.00 - 16.45

ANZICS Oration
Room: Concert Hall
Chair: A/Prof. Mary White

ACCCN - International Update
Room: Grand Ballrooms 2 & 3
Speaker: Prof. Paul Fulbrook

16.45 - 17.00

Presentation by 2014 ASM Committee
Room: Concert Hall

Presentation by 2014 ASM Committee
Room: Grand Ballrooms 2 & 3

19.00 - 24.00

Gala Dinner

Venue: PW1

 

This program is subject to change. Please follow the ASM on Twitter: @ANZICSACCCN_ASM or browse the Conference website for updated information.

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Social Program

Welcome Reception

Delegates and exhibitors are invited to the Welcome Reception in the Exhibition Hall located in the Federation Ballroom of the Hotel Grand Chancellor. This is an opportunity for us to welcome you to the Conference and for you to meet and mingle with other participants or rekindle past friendships. An evening of fine food and wine not to be missed!

Thursday 17 October 2013
Federation Ballroom, Hotel Grand Chancellor
5.30pm - 7.00pm
Cost: Included in registration fee
Additional tickets: $77 per person
Dress: Smart Casual

Entry is by ticket only. Delegates must indicate their attendance in order to receive a ticket.

Paediatric Dinner

Directly after the Welcome Reception, paediatric delegates can enjoy a sumptuous dinner at one of Tasmania's most awarded wineries and restaurants, Frogmore Creek (formerly Meadowbank Estate). Featuring fabulous food, fantastic views and fine company, it will be a night to remember!

When: Thursday 17 October 2013
Venue: Frogmore Creek, 699 Richmond Road, Cambridge (transport provided)
Time: 7.30pm - 11.00pm
Cost: Included in paediatric and full meeting registration fee
Additional tickets: $120 per person
Dress: Smart Casual

Entry is by ticket only. Delegates must indicate their attendance in order to receive a ticket.

Friday Party Night

After the day's scientific program has finished join with friends and colleagues in enjoying a fabulous night at the spectacular Museum of Old and New Art, MONA, described by owner David Walsh as "a subversive adult Disneyland". This event promises to be a night of dancing, music and modern art!

Friday 18 October 2013
The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA)
7.00pm - 12.00am
Cost: Included in full and adult meeting registration fee
Additional tickets: $120 per person
Dress: Smart Casual

Entry is by ticket only. Delegates must indicate their attendance in order to receive a ticket.

Conference Dinner

The social highlight and perfect end to the ASM - enjoy Tasmania's finest food and wine at Princes Wharf, on Hobart's waterfront. A night not to be missed!

Saturday 19 October 2013
PW1, Sullivans Cove
7.00pm - 12.00am
Cost: Included in full and adult meeting registration fee
Additional tickets: $150 per person
Dress: Black Tie or Lounge Suit

Entry is by ticket only. Delegates must indicate their attendance in order to receive a ticket.

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Accompanying Persons Tours

The Agrarian Kitchen

Days:
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Cost:
Website:
Bookings:

Please refer to the website calendar to see when classes are available
0900 - 1630
650 Lachlan Road, Lachlan
$350 per person
www.theagrariankitchen.com
Book direct with the Agrarian Kitchen on 03 6261 1099

The Agrarian KitchenA sustainable farm-based cooking school situated in a 19th century schoolhouse. The Agrarian Kitchen is committed to reconnecting the kitchen with the land. Their aim is to create a place where people can rediscover the simple pleasures of gathering and cooking with produce as close to its source as possible.

The Agrarian Kitchen is a working farm that grows and uses heirloom varieties of fruit, vegetables and rare breed animals in its cooking classes and also sources ingredients from local farmers, fishermen, gardeners and artisanal producers.
 

Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary

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Cost:

Website:
Bookings:
 

Daily
Tours at 1130 and 1400
593 Briggs Road, Brighton
Standard entry: Adults $24, Children $10
Night tour: Adults $149 each, Children $49 each (minimum price 2 adult entries)
www.bonorong.com.au
Book direct with Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary on 03 6268 1184
or info@bonorong.com.au

Bonorong Wildlife SanctuaryBonorong Wildlife Sanctuary is a rescue service for orphaned and injured wildlife. Only 30 minutes from Hobart, get up close and personal with Tasmania's special species. Come and see active Tasmanian devils and learn about this incredibly unique species and its fight for survival. Hand feed our huge mob of free ranging kangaroos with a complimentary bag of kangaroo food on entry. Join a tour and meet orphan wombats and koalas.
 

Bruny Island Cruises

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Daily
1100 - 1400
Adventure Bay, Bruny Island
$110 per adult, $65 per child
www.brunycruises.com.au
Book online with Bruny Island Cruises

Bruny CruisesThis multi-award winning three-hour eco-adventure cruise takes you through some of Tasmania's unspoilt coastline like nobody else. Safe, fast and comfortable boats ensure you're right in the adventure - seeing everything up close, feeling every thrill and experiencing nature first hand.

Bruny Island boasts stunning natural cliff formations, among the tallest in the world. The awesome 'Breathing Rock', the towering 'Monument' and the lush emerald green forests of South Bruny - you will fall in love with this island paradise. The impressive array of sea and coastal wildlife rivals many national parks throughout the world. Meet the Bruny Island seals, dolphins, whales, albatross, eagles, gannet, shearwater and petrel who live in this delicate ecosystem.

Highly trained interperative guides love what they do - they'll make your experience fun, enjoyable, entertaining and informative.

After an unforgettable three hour 50km journey, you'll return to shore knowing you've been involved in a remarkable voyage of discovery - not just Tasmania's best, but simply one of the world's great environmental travel experiences.
 

Cascade Brewery

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Daily
2 hour duration. Tours operate daily at 1100, 1300 and 1430
140 Cascade Road, South Hobart
$22 per person
www.cascadebreweryco.com.au
Book direct with the Cascade Brewery on 03 6224 1117

Cascade BreweryIt's been called a must-do Hobart experience. Here you'll learn about Australia's oldest brewery, its finest beers, the brewing process and a little something our brewers call 'The Feel'.

Intertwine it with some of the brewers' stories and the beautiful 'Woodstock' gardens, before topping it off with a real taste of history - a fresh one directly from the taps.
 

Gourmania Food Tours

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Bookings:

Monday, Thursday, Friday
Please refer to the website for available times
Please refer to the website for locations
$95 - $165 per person
www.gourmaniafoodtours.com.au
Book online with the Gourmania Food Tours

Gourmania Food ToursGourmania Food Tours Tasmania was established in 2011 by pastry chef and sixth generation Tasmanian, Mary McNeill. Whether you're a local or a visitor to Hobart, Gourmania can introduce you to some of the people whose passion and talent stirs the pot of our blossoming food scene. We visit great local businesses, many that are off the tourist trail, tucked away in the city. We create an experience that enables individual connections to the places we explore together. Be prepared to be generously catered for!
 

MONA Museum & Art Gallery

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Cost:

Website:

Wednesday - Monday
1000 - 1800
65 Main Road, Berriedale
$20 per person
(no charge for Tasmanian residents and children under 18 years)
www.mona.net.au

MONA Museum and Art GalleryThe Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is an art museum located within the Moorilla winery on the Berriedale peninsula, only a 15 minute drive from the centre of Hobart. It is the largest privately funded museum in Australia. The museum presents antiquities, modern and contemporary art from the David Walsh collection. Walsh has described the museum as a "subversive adult Disneyland."
 

Mount Field National Park

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Daily
60 kilometres (1 hour drive) north-west of Hobart
www.discovertasmania.com

Mount Field National ParkMount Field is the location of what must be the most photographed waterfall in Tasmania - Russell Falls. Its three elegant tiers, framed by lush vegetation, have attracted visitors for well over a hundred years.

The diversity of Mount Field's 16,265 hectares (40,191 acres) is remarkable. Striking as the falls are, if you confine yourself to the area near the Visitor Centre at the bottom of the mountain you'll miss an accessible and extraordinarily beautiful alpine experience - the Tarn Shelf above Lake Dobson.

Mount Field National Park is distinguished by its wide range of popular short, medium and longer walks. If you are an avid trekker intending to return to the park a number of times, a book on Tasmania's bushwalks would be very useful.

Most of Tasmania's land mammals are present in the park, and there's a good chance you will see a small marsupial on one of the walking tracks or near the Visitor Centre.
 

Mt Wellington Descent

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Bookings:

Daily
Tours depart at 1000 and 1300
Departing from Brooke St Pier, Hobart
$75 per adult, $65 per child
www.mtwellingtondescent.com.au
Book direct with Mt Wellington Descent on 03 6274 1880

Mt Wellington DescentDepart Hobart and Drive 21km by minibus to the summit of Mount Wellington. On the way, a guide will provide some interpretation giving an insight into the Mountain itself. Rising to a height of 1270 metres, Mt Wellington is a spectacular and panoramic backdrop for the city of Hobart. From the top you'll see magnificent 360 degree views - the Derwent Valley, down to the Southern Ocean and across to the Tasman Peninsula. The inlets, bays and hills of this beautiful city are spread out in a stunning panorama, detailed at the observation deck.

Take in the views of the distant mountain ranges of the southwest to the sprawling city of Hobart below. Your guide will then fit you with a bicycle, helmet and safety vest followed by a detailed cycle safety briefing. After a practice ride at the summit, regroup and follow your guide on a downhill descent of the mountain. Cycle past the historic Female Factory and through South Hobart and Battery Point. Enjoy cruising beneath the tree-lined streets filled with Georgian and Federation architecture completing the journey back to the vibrant Hobart Waterfront.
 

Peppermint Bay Cruise and Lunch

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Bookings:

Daily
Tours operate 7 days a week, 1030 - 1600
Full day tours collect from Hobart waterfront office
Prices vary from $98 - $168 per person
www.peppermintbay.com.au/homepage_pbc.php
Book direct with Peppermint Bay Cruises on 1300 137 919

Peppermint Bay CruisesBe assured of a relaxing, rejuvenating and rewarding day discovering the real Tasmania on board the luxurious 23 metre catamaran, Peppermint Bay II. Leaving from the tourist hub of Sullivan's Cove in Hobart Tasmania, the Peppermint Bay Cruise takes in the harbour, the River Derwent, and the magnificent waters of the d'Entrecasteax Channel, on its way to Peppermint Bay.

Chefs will have your lunch ready and waiting at Peppermint Bay. Enjoy the set three course banquet style lunch featuring the best of what the region has to offer.
 

Ratho Golf Course

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Cost:

Website:
Bookings:

Daily
Highland Lakes Road, Bothwell
Rounds cost $25 per person
Golf and Distillery Package - $85 incl. GST
www.rathogolf.com
Book direct with the golf course on 0409 595 702

Ratho Gold CourseThe arrival of golf in the Australian colonies is interwoven with the early development of the game in Scotland. Today, the Ratho golf links remain one of the world's best preserved, ancient golfing grounds. Ratho is in Bothwell, situated in the Clyde River Valley at the southern gateway to the central Highlands approximately a 1 hour drive from Hobart along the Midlands Highway.
 

Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

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Bookings:
 

Daily
Open 7 days a week (refer to website for seasonal opening hours)
Queens Domain, Hobart
No entry fee
www.rtbg.tas.gov.au
No need to book
 

Tasman Island Cruises

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Bookings:

Daily
Tours operate 7 days a week, 0700 - 1800
Full day tours collect from Hobart waterfront office
$180 per person
www.tasmancruises.com.au
Book direct with Tasman Island Cruises on 03 6250 2200

Tasman Island CruisesThis award-winning wilderness cruise takes you along the spectacular coastline between Eaglehawk Neck and Port Arthur. One of the highlights of the cruise is Tasman Island, a great landmark of the Southern Ocean - its slender white lighthouse is still a beacon for seafarers entering Storm Bay including during the famous annual Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

Few places on Earth have such a rich variety of marine wildlife and seabirds. The Continental Shelf runs close to Tasman Island and an upwelling of nutrients from the ocean's depths creates a smorgasbord for all the creatures in the complex food chain of the sea, from plankton and birdlife such as albatross to sharks, dolphins and southern right whales.

Highly trained, informative, entertaining and enthusiastic guides will take you on a full day tour from Hobart, which includes a three hour eco-cruise, a scenic bus tour from Hobart to Port Arthur return, morning tea and lunch.

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